Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Windows service application. Currently all admin tasks are done through config editing.

I want to add some sort of command line interfaces - and i want it to do through powershell.

And i don't know where should i start - how can i create application interface in this case. How powershell should communicate with service? remote feature also required in this case.

(In the feature there are maybe other admin tools - with GUI or through browser.)

share|improve this question
1  
HttpListener ? –  L.B Sep 25 '12 at 12:02
    
Simple and straightforward - don't know why - but i didn't thought about this. –  Nikita Martyanov Oct 5 '12 at 6:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Expanding a little on L.B's short-ish remark: having a privileged service interact with the user's desktop is not the best of ideas, because doing so may open a route for privilege elevation. Shatter attacks for instance worked that way.

A better way to handle interaction with the user would be to have an unprivileged listener on localhost (e.g. 127.0.0.1:5555) that will display messages submitted via that port, and have the privileged service connect to the listener to send messages to the user.

The code snippet below - while leaving a lot room for improvement - should give you a general idea of how such a listener could look like:

$addr = "127.0.0.1"
$port = 5555

[byte[]]$byte = @(0)
$enc = [System.Text.Encoding]::ASCII
[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("System.Windows.Forms")

$socket = New-Object System.Net.Sockets.TcpListener([System.Net.IPAddress]::Parse($addr), $port)
$socket.Start()
while ( $true ) {
  $client = $socket.AcceptTcpClient()
  $stream = $client.GetStream()
  [byte[]]$input = @()
  while ( ($i = $stream.Read($byte, 0, 1)) -ne 0 ) { $input += $byte }
  $client.Close()
  [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox]::Show($enc.GetString($input), "Title")
}
share|improve this answer

A Windows service initially looks something like this:

using System.ServiceProcess;
internal partial class MyService : ServiceBase
{
    static void Main()
    {
        ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] { new MyService() };
        ServiceBase.Run( ServicesToRun );
    }
}

What I have done is modify Main() so that I can use it both to launch the service and to process command-line stuff, like this:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.ServiceProcess;
internal partial class MyService : ServiceBase
{
    const int ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS = -1;

    [DllImport( "kernel32.dll" )]
    static extern bool AttachConsole( int dwProcessId );
    [DllImport( "kernel32.dll" )]
    static extern bool FreeConsole();

    static void Main()
    {
        if ( Environment.UserInteractive ) {
            try {
                // Redirect console output to the parent process.
                AttachConsole( ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS );

                // Process command line arguments here...
            } catch {
                // Handle exceptions here...
            } finally {
                // Detach from the console.
                FreeConsole();
            }
        } else {
            ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] { new MyService() };
            ServiceBase.Run( ServicesToRun );
        }
    }
}

When the executable is built, I register it with the operating system as normal (actually, I use a -install command-line option to do that). When the service is started, the UserInteractive flag is false, so the service starts as usual. From a command prompt, though, the UserInteractive flag is true, so the command-line processing takes over.

All you need at this point is have the command-line instance of your executable communicate with the service instance of your executable via some sort of IPC - socket, pipe, shared memory, WCF, etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.