Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like handle the occurred System.Timers.Timer elapsed exception (in my DLL library) within my WPF application. But I'm not be able to do that. It throws in my DLL library and the application will crashing... Does anybody know how I can solve the problem?

Here my code:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    MyClass _myClassInstance = null;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        try
        {
            _myClassInstance = new MyClass();
        } 
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            //Here i would like to receive the exception
            //But it never goes in there
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

public class MyClass
{
    private System.Timers.Timer _timer = null;

    public MyClass()
    {
        _timer = new Timer();
        _timer.Interval = 2000; //2 Seconds
        _timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(_timer_Elapsed);
        _timer.Start();
        ConnectTo();
    }

    void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        //If timer is elapsed I have to raise an exception
        throw new Exception("It's taking longer than expected. Progress cancelled!");
    }

    private void ConnectTo()
    {
        //Just an example implementation

        //Do something!!
        //Connect to SerialPort and wait for correct response

        //If connected than
        _timer.Stop();
    }
}
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

The exception is thrown on another thread (as per your choice for Timing.Timer).

Try this inside 1 assembly: you can't catch it either. That it's in a DLL doesn't matter.

You can only solve this by re-thinking the problem and picking another solution.

share|improve this answer
    
That's right. But are there possibilities to solve it anyway? Or what kinds of concepts are best practise for doing such operations. –  user1011394 Sep 25 '12 at 12:09
    
Describe 'such operations'. First rule would be to avoid threading and Timers in a library. And when you do use them they should be completely self-contained. –  Henk Holterman Sep 25 '12 at 12:10
    
For example: to handle timeouts which can occur if you try to connect to a device (SerialPort) within a timespan and the device isn't respond fast enough. I've thought I can implement a timer, start it, and when the timer elapsed I can raise an exception. But, here we are, it doesn't work. So you are totally correct. I have to re-thinking the problem. But any ideas would be greatly appreciated. –  user1011394 Sep 25 '12 at 12:14
    
@user1011394 I've given an exact example of one method below –  CrazyCasta Sep 25 '12 at 12:22
add comment

The exception is happening inside the event. This is run on another thread, therefore it's never going to make it back to your original thread.

Two possibilities to do this differently.

  1. Your serial port com library has some sort of timeout functionality (maybe), just use it instead.
  2. Do your serial port checking on a separate tread. If your time runs out, kill that thread.

    public class MyClass
    {
        private System.Timers.Timer _timer = null;
        private Thread t;
    
        public MyClass()
        {
            _timer = new Timer();
            _timer.Interval = 2000; //2 Seconds
            _timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(_timer_Elapsed);
            _timer.Start();
            t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ConnectTo));
            t.Start();
            t.Join();
        }
    
        void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            //If timer is elapsed I have to raise an exception
            if (t != null)
                t.Abort();
        }
    
        private void ConnectTo()
        {
            //Just an example implementation
    
            //Do something!!
            //Connect to SerialPort and wait for correct response
    
            //If connected than
            _timer.Stop();
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
t.Start(); t.Join(); - why even bother to create a Thread? –  Henk Holterman Sep 25 '12 at 12:24
    
So he can kill it. That's the whole problem. Maybe you should read a little more of the code next time. –  CrazyCasta Sep 25 '12 at 12:28
    
But that was a side-problem. How about the original main issues? –  Henk Holterman Sep 25 '12 at 12:30
    
His original main issue is that his timer exception is not killing w/e blocking I/O he's doing like he'd hoped it would. –  CrazyCasta Sep 25 '12 at 12:35
    
But don't you think the MainWindow would like to continue? –  Henk Holterman Sep 25 '12 at 13:27
show 1 more comment

As an alternative approach, rather trying to control your application flow with Exceptions, you could use events instead e.g.

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    MyClass _myClassInstance = null;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        _myClassInstance = new MyClass();
        _myClassInstance.TimedOut += delegate (object sender, EventArgs e) {
            ((MyClass)sender).CancelConnect();
            MessageBox.Show("Timeout!");
        };
        _myClassInstance.ConnectTo();
    }
}

...

public class MyClass
{
    Timer _timer = new Timer();

    public event EventHandler TimedOut;

    void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        OnTimedOut();
    }

    private void OnTimedOut()
    {
        var handler = TimedOut;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    public void ConnectTo(int timeout = 2000)
    {
        CancelConnect();
        _timer.Interval = timeout; // pass timeout in so it's flexible
        _timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(_timer_Elapsed);
        _timer.Start();
        // do connect stuff...
        _timer.Stop();
    }

    public void CancelConnect()
    {
        _timer.Stop();
        // cancel connect stuff...
    }
}

I think you had far too much going on in your constructor for MyClass so I moved it into ConnectTo which you invoke directly from your MainWindow.

share|improve this answer
    
How is he supposed to use this w/ his connect stuff which is presumably blocking? I already answered how to do this with threads below, using events is superfluous. –  CrazyCasta Sep 25 '12 at 12:25
    
@CrazyCasta without the actual source of ConnectTo your presumption is exactly that. This solution simply ensures that the MainWindow is notified if the timer runs (which indicates there was a timeout). Timers are run on a different thread so even if the ConnectTo stuff blocks the UI thread, it won't block the timer. –  James Sep 25 '12 at 13:53
add comment

Not work:

MessageBox.Show(e.Message); doen's throw

public class MyClass
{
    private System.Timers.Timer _timer = null;
    private Thread t;

    public MyClass()
    {
        try
        {
        _timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
        _timer.Interval = 5000; //2 Seconds
        _timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(_timer_Elapsed);
        _timer.Start();
        t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ConnectTo));
        t.Start();
        t.Join();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {

            MessageBox.Show(e.Message);
        }
    }

    void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        //If timer is elapsed I have to raise an exception
        if (t != null)
        {
            t.Abort();
        }
    }

    private void ConnectTo()
    {
        //Just an example implementation

        //Do something!!
        try
        {
            //Connect to SerialPort and wait for correct response
            using (SqlConnection _SC = new SqlConnection("aaaa"))
            {
                _SC.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {

            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            //If connected than
            _timer.Stop();
        }



    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.