Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a string "nice to meet you!", and I want to print without first letter, than is only "ice to meet you!"

I try to do as follows, however, the program will close by itself after compiling and running.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
 char *s = "nice to meet you!";

 printf("Original string: %s\n",*s);

 printf("Pointer plus one gives: %s\n", *(s+1));

 return 0;
}

What is wrong with my program?

share|improve this question
3  
Do you really understand what this does *s? If not, refer to your book - normally pointers are introduced quite early on.... –  Nim Sep 25 '12 at 12:21
    
How about running it in a debugger? –  Alexey Frunze Sep 25 '12 at 12:55
1  
There's nothing wrong with your program it does exactly what you told it to. Do you know what you're telling it to do? –  Mike Sep 25 '12 at 13:46

6 Answers 6

You should print s rather than *s

The %s format token expects a pointer. s is a pointer to a string, whereas *s is the value of the first character in a string. printf("%s", *s) will print a string starting from the address of the character code of the first char in your string. This address likely won't be valid for your process hence the unhandled exception you're getting.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your explanation. I don't know that "%s" would require the address of the string literal. –  di zhang Sep 25 '12 at 14:05
    
@dizhang Glad it helped. If you're satisfied with this as an answer, can you accept it (by clicking on the outline of a tick under the upvote count on the left) please? –  simonc Sep 25 '12 at 14:27

*s dereferences the pointer resulting in a char. So try the following:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
 char *s="nice to meet you!";

 printf("Original string: %s \n",s);
 printf("Original first char: %c\n", *s);

 printf("Pointer plus one gives: %s\n", (s+1));

 return 0;
}

To see the difference.

Regards

share|improve this answer

mmhm, you use pointer to pointer of string instead of pointer to string (with printf). Try

printf ("aaa %s bbb\n", s ); 

or

printf ("aaa %s bbb\n", s+1 ); 
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks. You are right, Sir. –  di zhang Sep 25 '12 at 14:06

I try to do as follows, however, the program will close by itself after compiling and running.

Run your program through the terminal. What are you using to compile and run your program?

What is wrong with my program?

*(s+1) is a single character.

share|improve this answer

Try this, just use the dowhatopwant function with your string:

void my_putchar(char c)
{
  write(1, &c, 1);
}

void dowhatopwant(char *str)
{
  int cnt = 1;
  while (s[cnt])
  {
     my_putchar(s[cnt]);
     cnt++;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

The code is doing exactly what you are telling it to do, I think perhaps you don't understand what you're telling it to do.

char *s = "nice to meet you!";

// s is a pointer to a character
// s* is the character that "s" points to

You have s pointing to the character 'n'. s also happens to be pointing to the first character in a NULL terminated string literal.

printf("Original character: %c\n",*s); //Note the %c, we're looking at a character
output-> Original character: n

printf("Original string: %s\n",s); //Note the %s, and we're feeding the printf a pointer now
output-> Original string: nice to meet you!

When it comes to offsets:

*s     = the character s is pointing at, 'n'
*(s+1) = the next character s is pointing at, 'i'

vs:

s     = the address of the string "nice to meet you"
(s+1) = the address of the string "ice to meet you"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your prominent answer. Regards to you. –  di zhang Sep 25 '12 at 14:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.