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I got a piece of code from Internet to encrypt my data using TripleDES.

$key = "ThisIsTheKey"; // 24 bit Key
$iv = "fYfhHeDm"; // 8 bit IV
$bit_check = 8; // bit amount for diff algor.


//function to encrypt
function encrypt($text) {
    global $key,$iv,$bit_check;
    $text_num = str_split($text, $bit_check);
    $text_num = $bit_check - strlen($text_num[count($text_num) - 1]);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $text_num; $i++) {
        $text = $text . chr($text_num);
    }
    $cipher = mcrypt_module_open(MCRYPT_TRIPLEDES, '', 'cbc', '');
    mcrypt_generic_init($cipher, $key, $iv);
    $decrypted = mcrypt_generic($cipher, $text);
    mcrypt_generic_deinit($cipher);
    return base64_encode($decrypted);
}

The problem is even though I call the variables as global, in the top (where I declared the variables) show the variable are unused. As well as when I try to run this it gave an error. But when I declare the same variable set inside the function it works.

Please assist me on this asap.

share|improve this question
9  
Before you start dealing with security - you need to learn php very basics. Seriously. –  zerkms Sep 25 '12 at 12:46
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please provide the exact error message. –  Axel Isouard Sep 25 '12 at 12:46
    
Quick guess: what if you prepend each variable outside the function with global? –  zerkms Sep 25 '12 at 12:47
1  
@zerkms Sod it, just prepend every variable declaration in the entire project with global :-P –  DaveRandom Sep 25 '12 at 12:48
    
@DaveRandom: and that wouldn't make that code worse ;-) –  zerkms Sep 25 '12 at 12:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

As a general note, The use of global variables is highly not recommended. When I look at your function, I see it only needs $text, however, it actually needs $text, $key, $iv, and $bit_check.

Lets try not using globals:

$key = "ThisIsTheKey"; // 24 bit Key
$iv = "fYfhHeDm"; // 8 bit IV
$bit_check = 8; // bit amount for diff algor.


//function to encrypt
function encrypt($text, $key, $iv, $bit_check) {
    $text_num = str_split($text, $bit_check);
    $text_num = $bit_check - strlen($text_num[count($text_num) - 1]);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $text_num; $i++) {
        $text = $text . chr($text_num);
    }
    $cipher = mcrypt_module_open(MCRYPT_TRIPLEDES, '', 'cbc', '');
    mcrypt_generic_init($cipher, $key, $iv);
    $decrypted = mcrypt_generic($cipher, $text);
    mcrypt_generic_deinit($cipher);
    return base64_encode($decrypted);
}

And call it using

encrypt("Hello World!", $key, $iv, $bit_check);

Another solution involves the use of CONSTANTS, assuming the key, iv and bit_check will never change throughout the entire execution time, you can define them as constants, and they would be globally available throughout the entire application, and will not be able to change.

Like so:

const KEY = "ThisIsTheKey"; // 24 bit Key
const IV = "fYfhHeDm"; // 8 bit IV
const BIT_CHECK = 8; // bit amount for diff algor.


//function to encrypt
function encrypt($text) {
    $text_num = str_split($text, BIT_CHECK);
    $text_num = BIT_CHECK - strlen($text_num[count($text_num) - 1]);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $text_num; $i++) {
        $text = $text . chr($text_num);
    }
    $cipher = mcrypt_module_open(MCRYPT_TRIPLEDES, '', 'cbc', '');
    mcrypt_generic_init($cipher, KEY, IV);
    $decrypted = mcrypt_generic($cipher, $text);
    mcrypt_generic_deinit($cipher);
    return base64_encode($decrypted);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Was about to hit "Post" when I saw your answer. :) –  Simon Germain Sep 25 '12 at 12:48
    
@sgermain06: Happens :) –  Second Rikudo Sep 25 '12 at 12:49
    
This was there. But the problem is for every time I need to pass the all parameters whenever I call this function. So is there any way to simplify it. –  Sumer Sep 25 '12 at 12:57
2  
@sumer: What's wrong with passing all parameters? If your function needs all of those to work, you should be passing it in. When you write a recepie for a cake, you write "You need flour, water and eggs", not "You need flour" and then hope the reader would understand water and eggs are needed too. –  Second Rikudo Sep 25 '12 at 12:58
    
If "water and eggs" don't change for each call, use constants. :) –  Fry_95 Sep 25 '12 at 13:01

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