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This bean 'State' :

public class State {

    private boolean isSet;

    @JsonProperty("isSet")
    public boolean isSet() {
        return isSet;
    }

    @JsonProperty("isSet")
    public void setSet(boolean isSet) {
        this.isSet = isSet;
    }

}

is sent over the wire using the ajax ' success' callback :

        success : function(response) {  
            if(response.State.isSet){   
                alert('success called successfully)
            }

Is the annotation @JsonProperty required here ? What is the advantage of using it ? I think I can remove this annotation without causing any side effects.

Reading about this annotion on http://wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonAnnotations I don't know when this is required to be used ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here's a good example. I use it to rename the variable because the JSON is coming from a .Net environment where properties start with an upper-case letter.

public class Parameter {
  @JsonProperty("Name")
  public String name;
  @JsonProperty("Value")
  public String value; 
}

This correctly parses to/from the JSON:

"Parameter":{
  "Name":"Parameter-Name",
  "Value":"Parameter-Value"
}
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Can the the String member variables not be renamed to their correct case, so public String name; becomes public String Name; ? –  blue-sky Sep 25 '12 at 13:29
3  
Yes they can, but in a Java environment that makes them not match coding standards. It's more about my pedantry that a real coding issue but it is a good yet simple example of a real use of the @JsonProperty annotation. –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 25 '12 at 14:43

I think OldCurmudgeon and StaxMan are both correct but here is one sentence answer with simple example for you.

@JsonProperty(name), tells Jackson ObjectMapper to map the JSON property name to the annotated Java field's name.

//example of json that is submitted 
"Car":{
  "Type":"Ferrari",
}

//where it gets mapped 
public static class Car {
  @JsonProperty("Type")
  public String type;
 }
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well for what its worth now... JsonProperty is ALSO used to specify getter and setter methods for the variable apart from usual serialization and deserialization. For example suppose you have a payload like this:

{
  "check": true
}

and a Deserializer class:

public class Check {

  @JsonProperty("check")    // It is needed else Jackson will look got getCheck method and will fail
  private Boolean check;

  public Boolean isCheck() {
     return check;
  }
}

Then in this case JsonProperty annotation is neeeded. However if you also have a method in the class

public class Check {

  //@JsonProperty("check")    Not needed anymore
  private Boolean check;

  public Boolean getCheck() {
     return check;
  }
}

Have a look at this documentation too: http://jackson.codehaus.org/1.1.2/javadoc/org/codehaus/jackson/annotate/JsonProperty.html

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Without annotations, inferred property name (to match from JSON) would be "set", and not -- as seems to be the intent -- "isSet". This is because as per Java Beans specification, methods of form "isXxx" and "setXxx" are taken to mean that there is logical property "xxx" to manage.

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