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Currently I'm doing Unit testing of some project and all is fine except for the places where developers used something like this:

#if USING_EMULATOR
{ do nothing }
#else
{ do a lot of things }
#endif

or

#if USING_EMULATOR
  return;
#endif
{ do a lot of things }

Where the code under USING_EMULATOR was done for debug purposes I think. Also sometimes #if DEBUG appears. How can I check the actual piece of code if now the one for the debugging purposes only is trying to execute? #undef USING_EMULATOR doesn't help. I don't understand very clearly preprocessor constants and in C# they are even can't be set only defined/undefined so maybe I just do smth wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remove USING_EMULATOR from the conditional compilation symbols in your project Build settings.

You can also create different build configurations, with different set of conditional compilation symbols. E.g. Debug config defines DEBUG, while Release doesn't. This also means that if you want to execute actual code, you should run Release build, not Debug build.

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I see... The only way is to change the build options of the target project. Well at least it's my side's only change. –  Ritro Sep 26 '12 at 5:41
    
Well, technically it is not the only option as you should be able to #undef the symbol but then you must do it in each compilation unit, i.e. in each source code file, so this is the simplest solution. You can also create your own custom build config based on another one, and modify that to avoid messing with the original config. –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Sep 26 '12 at 6:58

Assuming that you have some latitude to refactor, you can extract these directives into private or protected properties and then give yourself a hook to modify the value in testing.

You could also extract a dependency on something like IRuntimeConfiguration, of which you can then substitute a stub for your tests.

For example:

public class ClassIAmTesting
{
    private readonly IRuntimeConfiguration _runtimeConfig;
    public ClassIAmTesting(IRuntimeConfiguration runtimeConfig)
    {
        _runtimeConfig = runtimeConfig;
    }

    public void MethodIWantToTest()
    {
        if(_runtimeConfig.IsDebug)
            return;

        // …
    }
}

public interface IRuntimeConfiguration
{
    bool IsDebug { get; }
    bool IsUsingEmulator { get; }
}

public class RuntimeConfiguration : IRuntimeConfiguration
{
    public bool IsDebug
    {
        get
        {
            return
#if DEBUG
                true;
#else
                false;
#endif
        }
    }

    // repeat for IsUsingEmulator
}

In this way, the "choice" of which code to run is not based on the preprocessor directive, but on the value of a regular bool property. If you substitute a different IRuntimeConfiguration implementation that always returns false, you can execute code as though not in DEBUG and not USING_EMULATOR even if the preprocessor values are really set.

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Thank you, that is a good advice and I will remeber it for future, but now I don't have a latitude you talk about. –  Ritro Sep 26 '12 at 5:20

Tricky one. If you want to unit test both sides of the #if, you'll have to do two builds - one with USING_EMULATOR defined, and one without.

This is because in C#, when code is conditionally compiled out, it's equivalent to it not existing at all. Therefore when (in your example) USING_EMULATOR is defined, it compiles to a different non-equivalent program to when USING_EMULATOR is not defined.

So if you want to unit test both "programs", you need to unit test two different builds of the software under test.

Depending on your scenario, it may be appropriate to restructure parts of your software so that different components can be overridden as required to change the behaviour as required in different environments. This way, both implementations of the overridden parts are present in every build, and can be tested using appropriately structured unit tests.

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@Jay has put together a pretty good example of the refactoring I suggested. –  tomfanning Sep 25 '12 at 14:19
    
No I don't have to test both sides, just one of them. Agree that the advice above was good, although not applicable to my situation. –  Ritro Sep 26 '12 at 5:23

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