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I'm trying to import a csv file in R. I have done it several times but with this specific file it returns me a error.

On the first row of the csv I have the names of the colums that are in part text and in part numbers, as they represent month, year, and the numbers of some observational points. The .csv file, even if larger, looks as follows:

Mo,Yr2,4,10,32,38,41,60,63,82

9,1980,    6.0,    0.2,    0.7,    1.0,    0.4,    0.7,    0.4,    1.5

10,1980,   25.1,   39.7,   41.4,   15.5,   20.8,   43.6,   37.1,   17.8

11,1980,   11.5,    8.6,   23.6,    7.5,   15.6,   12.2,   13.4,    7.6

12,1980,   59.6,   90.0,  103.9,   50.0,   67.1,  109.2,   81.6,   48.4  

I have tried the following getting an error:

> m <- read.csv(file="my_file.csv", sep=",",head=TRUE)

  Error in read.table(file = "my_file.csv", sep = ",", head = TRUE) : 
  duplicate 'row.names' are not allowed

so I have tried:

> m <- read.csv(file="my_file.csv", sep=",",head=TRUE,row.names=NULL)

> m

    row.names   Mo   Yr2    X4   X10   X32   X38   X41   X60   X63   X82

1           9 1980   6.0   0.2   0.7   1.0   0.4   0.7   0.4   1.5   NA

2          10 1980  25.1  39.7  41.4  15.5  20.8  43.6  37.1  17.8   NA

3          11 1980  11.5   8.6  23.6   7.5  15.6  12.2  13.4   7.6   NA

4          12 1980  59.6  90.0 103.9  50.0  67.1 109.2  81.6  48.4   NA

Can someone tell me what is the problem? Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
Your sample reads in just fine for me. As a guess, there may be some lines in your file that have more than 10 values...? –  joran Sep 25 '12 at 14:29
    
The original file has 76 columns, and 360 rows of data plus the one of the columns names, this is just a part of it. Anyway, looking at it in excel all the cells are filled and there are no values outside the "table". Another thing, if I try to import it without the header, it works. –  Corrado Sep 25 '12 at 14:34
    
Well, I wouldn't always believe everything you see in Excel. –  joran Sep 25 '12 at 14:39
    
It works in the sense that all the values remain correctly aligned in their columns but at the end it adds a 77th column with NA values everywhere. –  Corrado Sep 25 '12 at 14:42
    
Yeah, there's definitely an extra delimiter in there somewhere, but with no value, which is why you can't see it in Excel: the "extra" value is blank, so it's just an empty cell. –  joran Sep 25 '12 at 14:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have you used count.fields to see if all lines have the same number of delimiters? table(count.fields( ..)) is a useful check.

I've seen the problem you describe when there are a different number of delimiters on the header row than in the rest of the file.

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