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I'm wrapping a remote XML-based API from python 2.7. The API throws errors by sending along a <statusCode> element as well as a <statusDescription> element. Right now, I catch this condition and raise a single exception type. Something like:

class ApiError(Exception):
    pass

def process_response(response):
    if not response.success:
        raise ApiError(response.statusDescription)

This works fine, except I now want to handle errors in a more sophisticated fashion. Since I have the statusCode element, I would like to raise a specific subclass of ApiError based on the statusCode. Effectively, I want my wrapper to be extended like this:

class ApiError(Exception):
    def __init__(self, description, code):
        # How do I change self to be a different type?
        if code == 123:
            return NotFoundError(description, code)
        elif code == 456:
            return NotWorkingError(description, code)

class NotFoundError(ApiError):
    pass

class NotWorkingError(ApiError):
    pass

def process_response(response):
    if not response.success:
        raise ApiError(response.statusDescription, response.statusCode)

def uses_the_api():
    try:
        response = call_remote_api()
    except NotFoundError, e:
        handle_not_found(e)
    except NotWorkingError, e:
        handle_not_working(e)

The machinery for tying specific statusCode's to specific subclasses is straightforward. But what I want is for that to be buried inside of ApiError somewhere. Specifically, I don't want to change process_response except to pass in the value statusCode.

I've looked at metaclasses, but not sure they help the situation, since __new__ gets write-time arguments, not run-time arguments. Similarly unhelpful is hacking around __init__ since it isn't intended to return an instance. So, how do I instantiate a specific subclass based on arguments passed to __init__?

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1  
Why do you want to use a class if you need a method? Use a function that returns a different instance based on the status code –  Gabi Purcaru Sep 25 '12 at 14:28
    
@GabiPurcaru Good question. Because I don't want to significantly change the raise ApiError() line in process_response. I'm interested in how this could be done without disturbing existing raise statements. –  Don Spaulding Sep 25 '12 at 19:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Create a function that will yield requested error class basing on description. Something like this:

def get_valid_exception(description, code):
    if code == 123:
        return NotFoundError(description, code)
    elif code == 456:
        return NotWorkingError(description, code)

Depending on your requirements and future changes, you could create exceptions with different arguments or do anything else, without affecting code that uses this function.

Then in your code you can use it like this:

def process_response(response):
    if not response.success:
        raise get_valid_exception(response.statusDescription, response.statusCode)
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1  
Thanks. In lieu of a more elegant solution, this is more or less what I've ended up implementing. It's deliberate and concise, even if raise get_valid_exception() is less than perfect. –  Don Spaulding Sep 26 '12 at 18:34

You could create a series of subclasses and use the base class' __new__ as a factory for the children. However, that's probably overkill here; you could just create a simple factory method or class. If you wanted to get fancy in another direction though, you could create a metaclass for the base class that would automatically add your subclasses to a factory when they are created. Something like:

class ApiErrorRegistry(type):

    code_map = {}

    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):

        try:
            mapped_code = attrs.pop('__code__')
        except KeyError:
            if name != 'ApiError':
                raise TypeError('ApiError subclasses must define a __code__.')
            mapped_code = None
        new_class = super(ApiErrorRegistry, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)
        if mapped_code is not None:
            ApiErrorRegistry.code_map[mapped_code] = new_class
        return new_class

def build_api_error(description, code):

    try:
        return ApiErrorRegistry.code_map[code](description, code)
    except KeyError:
        raise ValueError('No error for code %s registered.' % code)


class ApiError(Exception):

    __metaclass__ = ApiErrorRegistry


class NotFoundError(ApiError):

    __code__ = 123


class NotWorkingError(ApiError):

    __code__ = 456


def process_response(response):

    if not response.success:
        raise build_api_error(response.statusDescription, response.statusCode)

def uses_the_api():
    try:
        response = call_remote_api()
    except ApiError as e:
        handle_error(e)
share|improve this answer
    
Your example here is more or less the solution I was prepping to build. Looking at it laid out like that, however, raise ApiErrorRegistry.build_error(description, code) smells worse than just a simple raise build_error(description, code). So I think I'll probably settle on a factory function if something better doesn't come along. –  Don Spaulding Sep 25 '12 at 15:51
    
Also, putting a handle() method on the exception subclasses seems suspicious. It doesn't apply to the wrapper I'm currently writing, and I have trouble envisioning a case where I would want the exception-handling logic in the class itself instead of in functions such as uses_the_api(). –  Don Spaulding Sep 25 '12 at 15:54
    
I was just trying to make it more concise, and it seemed like it made logical sense to attach the builder to the registry. Of course, there's no requirement to do so. As to handle, I didn't know how general use you intended this to be. If it doesn't make sense there, again, just separate the handler out. –  Silas Ray Sep 25 '12 at 16:24
    
Putting the builder in the registry does make some logical sense, but I don't like the way it looks on the raise line. If I'm going to give up aesthetics in the calling code for the sake of this implementation, I'd probably prefer the simplicity of a separate factory function like @Abgan's and Martijn Pieters' answers. –  Don Spaulding Sep 25 '12 at 18:51
    
Then make a separate factory that just references the registry class' value. I made it a classmethod in part so that it would be appropriate for the private-ish _code_map to be accessed from the factory method, but if you just access the registry from a factory function external to the registry class, it will still work. This is a style thing, not a functional question at this point. –  Silas Ray Sep 25 '12 at 18:55

A factory function is going to be much easier to understand. Use a dictionary to map codes to exception classes:

exceptions = {
    123: NotFoundError,
    456: NotWorkingError,
    # ...
}

def exceptionFactory(description, code):
    return exceptions[code](description, code)
share|improve this answer
    
I like your code example better, but this answer is functionally equivalent to @Abgan's, and his came first, so I accepted his answer instead. Thanks. –  Don Spaulding Sep 26 '12 at 18:37

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