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I just today learned a little about Composition over Inheritance. I was wondering if I should apply the concept to something I wrote recently.

We previously had two classes that were almost identical, aside from a couple small differences. They contained some basic database access features, but operated on different (but related) object types. So we previously had class that were structured something like this:

class BallMillDBHandler{

    public BallMillDBHandler(){ ... }

    public void InsertTool(BallMill tool) { ... }
    public BallMill QueryTool(string toolID) { ... }
    public void UpdateTool(BallMill tool) { ... }
    public void DeleteTool(string toolID) { ... }
}

class DiamondToolDBHandler{

    public DiamondToolDBHandler(){ ... }

    public void InsertTool(DiamondTool tool) { ... }
    public DiamondTool QueryTool(string toolID) { ... }
    public void UpdateTool(DiamondTool tool) { ... }
    public void DeleteTool(string toolID) { ... }
}

I took the majority of near-duplicated methods and refactored them out into a BaseToolDBHandler() class, and inherited it from the other two, providing a few abstract methods and properties to handle differences in accessing the database parameters themselves.

Would it make sense to make the BaseToolDBHandler a helper class instead, contained within the database accessors, and provide them a common interface the previously abstract properties/methods? Or should I leave it as a case of inheritance?

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5  
It sounds like the perfect place for inheritance to me so I'd leave it that way. –  Neil Kennedy Sep 25 '12 at 14:29
    
Neil Kennendy is right. But if your BaseClass just offers abstract methods and properties and never ever offers any implemented functionality use an interface instead (e.G. IDBHandler<T>). –  Jan P. Sep 25 '12 at 14:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This looks like a scenario that would benefit both generics and inheritance via a base class / interface.

class DBHandler<TTool> where TTool : ToolBase // or ITool
{
    public DBHandler(){ ... }

    public void InsertTool(TTool tool) { ... }
    public TTool QueryTool(string toolID) { ... }
    public void UpdateTool(TTool tool) { ... }
    public void DeleteTool(string toolID) { ... }
}

If you need to, you could make a base (optionally abstract) class, or an interface to use as a type constraint that would guarantee certain members that you needed the tools to have inside the method bodies.

Examples:

var handler = new DBHandler<BallMill>();
BallMill value = handler.QueryTool("xyz");
value.SomeProperty = "New Value";
handler.UpdateTool(value);
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1  
This does seem like it might be an option, but it would depend on what happens inside of those methods; they may or may not be similar enough for this to work. –  Servy Sep 25 '12 at 14:36
    
@Jamiec Indeed. Got it. –  Dan Sep 25 '12 at 14:39
    
I think making the base a generic would help out a good deal. I still need to maintain a different set of parameters by which the DB is accessed though, and I think keeping those in separate classes is better than passing them in at each instance. But this is helpful, I think I'll mark it as the accepted answer. –  KChaloux Sep 25 '12 at 14:42

Inheritance does tend to be over-used, but this seems like an appropriate case for it. In many cases people just see duplicate code and think "I'll use inheritance to remove the duplicate code through a base class." In reality, most duplicate code can be refactored into another class entirely that is used in several places. Usually the classes using it aren't "related" they are doing two entirely different things and just happen to share the need to do some (or some series of) small tasks.

Inheritance should be used when classes when you can really say that the class class "is" an instance of the base class, not just some class that needs access to a bunch of methods defined elsewhere. In your particular case, it's clear that both classes are DB handlers. At their crux, both of them are serving the same general goal, but they are two different possible implementations of that goal. The only problem that I could see here (given that you haven't shown the contents of any of the methods) is that you may be able to combine both classes into a single class, but we would need to know more about the details to know if that's either possible or preferable.

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I would say this is definitely a task for inheritance...but lets get one thing straight first. Composition is a design pattern that can and should be used where multiple inheritance of classes is not a feature of the given language (C# for example)

Composition implies that your Composite class instantiates classes, where usually they would be inherited. In this instance, you provide the contract to the implementation via interfaces.

To give you a rough example of how inheritance can be applied to your code, consider this: (this is not using composition)

public interface IHandler
{
    void InsertTool(ITool tool);
    void UpdateTool(ITool tool);
    void DeleteTool(string toolID);
    //void DeleteTool(ITool tool) - seems more consistent if possible!?

    ITool QueryTool(string toolID);
}

public interface ITool
{

}

class BallMill : ITool
{
}

class DiamondTool : ITool
{
}

class BallMillDBHandler : IHandler
{

    public BallMillDBHandler(){ ... }

    public void InsertTool(ITool tool) { ... }
    public BallMill QueryTool(string toolID) { ... }
    public void UpdateTool(ITool tool) { ... }
    public void DeleteTool(string toolID) { ... }
}

class DiamondToolDBHandler : IHandler
{

    public DiamondToolDBHandler(){ ... }

    public void InsertTool(ITool tool) { ... }
    public DiamondTool QueryTool(string toolID) { ... }
    public void UpdateTool(ITool tool) { ... }
    public void DeleteTool(string toolID) { ... }
}
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QueryTool not being on the interface pretty much grounds this answer as unworkable IMO. The interface has no real use. –  Jamiec Sep 25 '12 at 14:40
    
@Jamiec...time for an edit... –  series0ne Sep 25 '12 at 14:41

Rather than inheritance, use generics. You want to perform the same operation on different types of objects, which is exactly what generics do best.

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