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I want to make two calls to my database which will take a while to return a result, and I don't want to block the current thread. I have used Akka Futures to wrap the database calls.

Instead of waiting (blocking) for both calls to return, I would like to specify a callback function to be called, which can then render the response. How do I do that? Here is my controller code:

def showPie = IsAuthenticated(Roles.validator) { user => implicit request =>
    val eventUid = request.session.get(EventUid).get

    val printed = Akka.future(TicketRepository.getCountForState(eventUid, "Printed"))
    val validated = Akka.future(TicketRepository.getCountForState(eventUid, "Validated"))

    //this would be evil, because it would block: Ok(views.html.pie(printed.await(1000).get, validated.await(1000).get)) 

    //create a promise for all the promised results
    val promise = Promise.sequence(List(printed, validated))

    //this doesnt work, but how can I make it work WITHOUT blocking this thread?
    promise.callWhenResultIsReady(Ok(view.html.pie(promise.get))
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're close. You can simple call map on a promise to deal with it. Inside an Async block, it stays nonblocking. Relevant documentation (see "AsyncResult").

def showPie = IsAuthenticated(Roles.validator) { user => implicit request =>
    val eventUid = request.session.get(EventUid).get

    val printed = Akka.future(TicketRepository.getCountForState(eventUid, "Printed"))
    val validated = Akka.future(TicketRepository.getCountForState(eventUid, "Validated"))

    //create a promise for all the promised results
    val promise = Promise.sequence(List(printed, validated))
    Async {
        promise map { res =>
            Ok("Got it!" + res)
        }
    }
}

edit: From your comment below, let's take a closer look at the Async block. Async takes a Promise, and returns an AsyncResult, which is a subtype of Result (which is what Action needs).

    Async {
        // We take the promise, and add something akin to a callback
        //  function with `map`. This new function is called when `promise`
        //  is complete.
        val result = promise map { res => // this is the redeemed promise
          Ok("Got it!" + res)
        }
        result // this is the new promise
    } 

Since the map function is called when promise is complete, this stays non-blocking. This whole block returns quickly with an AsyncResult, and Play! manages it in a similar fashion by returning to the client when it finishes (and freeing Play! to do other things in the meantime).

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Do you know how it works under the hood? Is the Promise polled every so often to see if its ready, and if its not, Akka goes and does some other work? –  John Smith Sep 25 '12 at 18:36
    
Better than that. Since your calls are executed in a future, they're added to an actor's message queue behind the scenes, and when it's available (usually, very quickly), it will process it and then call any completion functions. On Akka actors, map, onComplete, onSuccess, and onFailure work this way. Your last promise (the sequence) just wraps the others, and executes the listening functions when each part is complete. Since all of this happens in callbacks, no polling is needed. –  Andrew Conner Sep 25 '12 at 18:39
    
The map call returns yet another Promise, which Async is happy to accept as the function literal return value. Then, it adds a listener method to that promise to return your message to the client. The whole process ends up being non-blocking, and requires no polling. –  Andrew Conner Sep 25 '12 at 18:42

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