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I can use

var regex = /[$&+,:;=?@#|]/;

if(elem.match(regex)) { // do something 
}

to find whether there is any special characters in string in Javascript.

How can I use the similar regular expression in Java?

I have tried:

str.match("\\="); // return false

For example:

String str = "123=456";

I tried to detect "=" in str.

That did not work. What am I doing wrong?

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closed as not a real question by verdesmarald, Mark, BNL, Sergey K., Stecya Sep 27 '12 at 10:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
A simple Google search for "java regex" and you could have found: java.util.regex all on your own! –  verdesmarald Sep 25 '12 at 15:38
    
show the pattern ou've tried –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Sep 25 '12 at 15:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this.

Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("[$&+,:;=?@#|]");
Matcher matcher = regex.matcher("123=456");
if (matcher.find()){
    // Do something
}

EDIT: matches() checks all the string and find() finds it in any part of the string.

A link: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/regex/index.html

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1  
For his particular regex, the pattern would be created with Pattern.compile("[$&+,:;=?@#|]") without the slashes. –  Brian Sep 25 '12 at 15:46
    
I tried your code. It can not work :( –  Shih-En Chou Sep 25 '12 at 15:50
    
sorry, my fault .... Because I used JSP, I forgot to refresh my server...... –  Shih-En Chou Sep 25 '12 at 16:20
    
@Sri Thanks a lot –  Shih-En Chou Sep 25 '12 at 16:53

Use String.match(). Check the javadocs for supported syntax.

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Use

String.matches(String regex);
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Here's some sample code:

import java.lang.Scanner;
/*setup everything here, you just need that import*/
Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
//ask for input
String str = input.next();
if(str.contains(/*char1*/) || str.contains(/*char2*/) || /*continue the pattern, 1 for every character*/)
{
    //event if it contains one
}
else
{
    //event if it does not contain any
}

an alternatve:

import java.lang.Scanner;
/*put the program parts here*/
Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
String str = input.next();
List<char> chars = Arrays.asList(/*put chars here, seperated with commas*/);
for(int x = 0; x < chars.size();x++)
{
    if(str.contains(chars[x]))
    {
        //event if it contains one
    }
    else
    {
        //event if it does not contain one
    }
}
//resume program

these code snippets will work, assuming everything is imported correctly.

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would someone explain why they downvoted my answer? it submitted before I had finished typing, and I edited it to contain the rest of the information. –  Grammar Sep 25 '12 at 15:54
    
This will only check if all the characters are in a sequence and not a single char as in the case of hisregex. -1 –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Sep 25 '12 at 16:01
    
@SriHarshaChilakapati could you explain? the first one checks if one or more of the characters are in the string, the second one does it one at a time using a for loop based off the size of a list that contains the special characters. –  Grammar Sep 25 '12 at 16:05
    
This type of check is limited to checking for a CharSequence and this is why regex is implemented –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Sep 25 '12 at 16:08
1  
@Grammer: Regular expressions are a very powerful tool, developed over years. Reinventing it in a bad way is not a good solution. –  juergen d Feb 5 '13 at 17:40

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