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I just got this error when trying to use a function parameter for a return value. I could only find answers to related issues but not this one.

Example:

void someNumber(int foo)
{
  foo = 3;
}

int bar;
someNumber(bar);

What's the problem here?

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2  
You're not using any kind of pass-by-reference here. Did you mean to make foo a ref parameter? –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 15:53
    
Also, if you want to return a value, why don't you just use the return value? It's very rare to want to use pass by reference for a void method. –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 15:54
    
For more information about parameter passing in C#, please read pobox.com/~skeet/csharp/parameters.html –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 15:57
    
You could have just used a return state in your method and obtain the value that way. –  Jean Carlos Suárez Marranzini Sep 25 '12 at 15:57
    
@JonSkeet Ah, damn oversimplified. The original function used a List<String> so no ref was necessary. Also, the version that caused the problem used more than one return value. –  Sarien Sep 25 '12 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As it turns out C# is a bit weird in this respect but better weird than C/C++. :)

If you pass a reference only for the output value you have to make that explicit in this way:

void someNumber(out int foo)
{
  foo = 3;
}

int bar;
someNumber(out bar);

So while you still have an output parameter in the input parameter list (at least that's what it is in my head) at least it is now blatantly obvious.

Note that it is now an error NOT to assign to foo in the body of someNumber. It's kind of like an anti-const, which would obviously have been a much cooler keyword. ;)

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2  
In what way is C# "a bit weird" here? Its rules are pretty straightforward and consistent, IMO. (Note that the OP is using straight pass-by-value - there's no out or ref modifier on the parameter.) –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 15:53
1  
Additionally, talking about "passing a reference" is very confusing; you're passing a variable by reference, which isn't the same thing as passing a reference (e.g. the value of a string variable) by value. –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 15:59
    
Can you please explain the difference? I'm not sure what you mean. –  Sarien Sep 25 '12 at 16:10
    
It's weird to use a parameter for the return value. There is now a "return value" and a list of additional return values that are in the parameter list with an "out" keyword. –  Sarien Sep 25 '12 at 16:12
    
Read the document I linked to and you'll see what I mean about the difference. And yes, it's weird to use a parameter for an output value - so try not to do it. (That's one reason your initial example was bad.) –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 16:14
void someNumber(int foo)
{
  foo = 3;
}

int bar;
someNumber(bar);

foo is an input parameter, so you can't change its value..

Because use return function.

int someNumber(int foo)
{
    foo=3;
    return foo;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can change the value of foo in the first snippet - it just won't make any difference to the original argument. –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 16:06

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