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I am trying to make myself better in python. There are some tools to do these stuffs, but I want to do it myself for two reasons.

  1. Learn some better ways
  2. flexibility in operation

I have two text files, exactly same size , same number of lines. I need to check 2nd, 6th (+4 everytime) line of text, see its beginning text, check whether it is similar to some predefined text, if so write that line along with the block of 4 in corresponding file, and write the same lines in another corresponding file. (For those to whom it sounded like something familiar, I am trying to demultiplex barcoded data from Illumina paired end sequence data).

I already have a working code but the problem is it takes days to finish. it took me about 10 minutes for 100,000 lines and I have 200 million.

I am posting the code here along with what I am thinking. OK, I have 100 keys, they are say ATCCGG, ACCTGG...etc. However if I have one mismatch, I would like to consider it as correct , for example DOG can have AOG, BOG, DIG, DAG, DOF,DOH....

def makehamming2(text,dist):

    dicthamming=dict()
    rep=["A","T","C","G"]

    if dist==1:
        for i in range(len(text)):

            for j in range(len(rep)):
                chars=list(text)
                if rep[j]<>chars[i]:
                    chars[i]=rep[j]
                    word="".join(chars)
                    dicthamming[word]=text
    return dicthamming

I am using dist=1.

I use this function for 100 barcodes, so, I have about ~100*18 items in dictionary.

count=0
eachline=1
writeflag=0
seqlen=int(seqlen)
cutlen=len(cutsite)
infile=open(inf, "r")
for line in infile:
        count+=1
        if eachline==1:
            writeflag=0
            header=line
            eachline=2
        elif eachline==2:
            eachline=3
            line=line.strip()
            if line[0:6] in searchdict.keys():

            barcode=searchdict[line[0:6]]

            towritefile=outfile+"/"+barcode+".fastq"


            seq=line[6:seqlen+6]
            qualstart=6
            writeflag=1
            seqeach[barcode]=seqeach.get(barcode,0)+1

    elif eachline==3:
        eachline=4
        third=line
    elif eachline==4:

        eachline=1
        line=line.strip()
        if writeflag==1:
            qualline=line[qualstart:qualstart+seqlen]
            addToBuffer=header+seq+"\n"+third+qualline+"\n"
            bufferdict[towritefile]=bufferdict.get(towritefile,"")+addToBuffer


            Fourlinesofpair=getfrompair(inf2,count, seqlen)


            bufferdictpair[towritefile[:-6:]+"_2.fastq"]=\
            bufferdictpair.get(towritefile[:-6:]+"_2.fastq","")+Fourlinesofpair

                if (count/4)%10000==0:
                    print "writing" , str((count/4))
                    for key, val in bufferdict.items():

                        writefile1=open(key,"a")
                        writefile1.write(val)
                        bufferdict=dict()


                    for key, val in bufferdictpair.items():


                        writefile1=open(key,"a")
                        writefile1.write(val)
                        bufferdictpair=dict()


                    end=(time.time()-start)/60.0
                    print "finished writing", str(end) , "minutes"


    print "writing" , str(count/4)                
    for key, val in bufferdict.items():


        writefile1=open(key,"a")
        writefile1.write(val)
        bufferdict=dict()
        writefile1.close()
    for key, val in bufferdictpair.items():

        writefile1=open(key,"a")
        writefile1.write(val)
        bufferdictpair=dict()
        writefile1.close()

    end=(time.time()-start)/60.0
    print "finished writing", str(end) , "minutes"

getfrompair is a function,

def getfrompair(inf2, linenum, length):

    info=open(inf2,"r")
    content=""
    for count, line in enumerate(info):
        #print str(count)

    if count == linenum-4:
        content=line
    if count == linenum-3:
        content=content+line.strip()[:length]+"\n"
    if count == linenum-2:
        content=content+line
    if count == linenum-1:
        content=content+line.strip()[:length]+"\n"
        #print str(count), content



        return content

So, my main question is how can I optimize it. In most of the cases I would assume this code to be run in at least 8gb memory and >4 core processors. Can I use multiprocessor? I used the buffer from suggestion in another thread here because that was faster than writing in disk after each line.

Thank you in advance for teaching me.

Edit 1 After Ignacio's suggestion, I did the profiling and "getfrompair" function is taking more than half of the run time? Is there better way to get a certain line from file without going through each at some time.

Profile result from a fraction (10000 lines, instead of original 800 million)

     68719 function calls in 2.902 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
       66    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(append)
       32    0.003    0.000    0.003    0.000 :0(close)
     2199    0.007    0.000    0.007    0.000 :0(get)
        8    0.002    0.000    0.002    0.000 :0(items)
        3    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(iteritems)
      750    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 :0(join)
     7193    0.349    0.000    0.349    0.000 :0(keys)
    39977    0.028    0.000    0.028    0.000 :0(len)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(mkdir)
      767    0.045    0.000    0.045    0.000 :0(open)
      300    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(range)
        1    0.005    0.005    0.005    0.005 :0(setprofile)
       96    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(split)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(startswith)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(stat)
     6562    0.016    0.000    0.016    0.000 :0(strip)
        4    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(time)
       48    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(update)
       46    0.004    0.000    0.004    0.000 :0(write)
      733    1.735    0.002    1.776    0.002 RC14100~.PY:273(getfrompair)
        1    0.653    0.653    2.889    2.889 RC14100~.PY:31(split)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 RC14100~.PY:313(makehamming)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.005    0.005 RC14100~.PY:329(processbc2)
       48    0.003    0.000    0.005    0.000 RC14100~.PY:344(makehamming2)
        1    0.006    0.006    2.896    2.896 RC14100~.PY:4(<module>)
     4553    0.015    0.000    0.025    0.000 RC14100~.PY:74(<genexpr>)
     2659    0.014    0.000    0.023    0.000 RC14100~.PY:75(<genexpr>)
     2659    0.013    0.000    0.023    0.000 RC14100~.PY:76(<genexpr>)
        1    0.001    0.001    2.890    2.890 RC14100~.PY:8(main)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 cProfile.py:5(<module>)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 cProfile.py:66(Profile)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 genericpath.py:15(exists)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 ntpath.py:122(splitdrive)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 ntpath.py:164(split)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 os.py:136(makedirs)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.902    2.902 profile:0(<code object <module> at 000000000211A9B0, file "RC14100~.PY", line 4>)
        0    0.000             0.000          profile:0(profiler)



Process "Profile" terminated, ExitCode: 00000000
share|improve this question
    
Where is the profiler output? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 25 '12 at 16:01
    
Your code has an indentation problem after the Fourlinesofpair=... line. I've fixed other formatting issues as much as I could. –  9000 Sep 25 '12 at 16:38
    
@9000, Thank you very much.. –  Ananta Sep 25 '12 at 16:44
    
@Ignacio, I never used profiler, I always used to do time call implicitly, May be I need to use profiler now. Thanks –  Ananta Sep 25 '12 at 16:44
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your getfrompair function makes this a classic O(n^2) problem, since you read through the second file each time you get a match. What you want to do instead is read from both files at the same time so that you're only going through it once. izip is the way to do that.

from itertools import izip

for line,line2 in izip(infile, infile2):
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, yes that helped. and I think more intutive when using lines from both files at the same time. –  Ananta Sep 26 '12 at 19:19
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>>> def dist(w1,w2):
...     return len(w1)-sum(map(lambda x:int(x[0]==x[1]),zip(w1,w2)))
...
>>> dist("DOG","FOG")
1
>>> dist("DOG","FOF")
2
>>> words = ["DOG","FOG","DAG","CAT","RAT","AOG","AAG"]
>>> print filter(lambda x:dist(target,x)<2,words)
['DOG', 'FOG', 'DAG', 'AOG']

then to do what you want

>>> import itertools
>>> my_alphabet = ["A","T","C","G"]
>>> target = "ATG"
>>> print filter(lambda x:dist(x,target)<2,itertools.permutations(my_alphabet,len(target)))
[('A', 'T', 'C'), ('A', 'T', 'G'), ('A', 'C', 'G'), ('C', 'T', 'G')]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this code. Yes, this calculates the distance between two words, and selects only those within 1 dist from the list. However, my interest was to create all combinations within 1 dist (of course only 4 chars, ATCG. Which I achieved through makehamming function. May not be best way, but not bad and its not the time consuming stuff here, what is time consuming is down process. By the way, is it better to check the distance of first 6 character of each line (200 million) to the list of barcodes (100) and store if its within 1 distance rather than working with prebuilt dictionary? –  Ananta Sep 25 '12 at 16:19
    
oh ... misunderstood what you wanted... –  Joran Beasley Sep 25 '12 at 16:20
    
edited ... now I think it does what you want... –  Joran Beasley Sep 25 '12 at 16:25
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