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The .NET System.Threading Timer class has several overloaded Change() methods that return "true if the timer was successfully updated; otherwise, false."

Ref: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yz1c7148.aspx

Does this method ever actually return false? What would cause this to return false?

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It does return false if you, eg. set it two times with the same values. –  VoidMain Sep 25 '12 at 16:22
2  
@VoidMain: No it doesn't. –  Tudor Sep 25 '12 at 16:24
2  
Thats weird, i can see in LinqPad the same timer returning false when i try to set the same paremeters a second time, i'll dig further into it. –  VoidMain Sep 25 '12 at 21:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Joe Duffy (the development lead, architect, and founder of the Parallel Extensions to the .NET Framework team at Microsoft) detailed in Concurrent Programming on Windows p 373

Note that although Change is typed as returning a bool, it will actually never return anything but true. If there is a problem changing the timer-such as the target object already having been deleted-an exception will be thrown.

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This can in fact return false if the unmanaged extern ChangeTimerNative were to return false. However, this is awfully unlikely.

Take note to Microsoft's code:

bool status = false;
bool bLockTaken = false; 

// prepare here to prevent threadabort from occuring which could
// destroy m_lock state.  lock(this) can't be used due to critical
// finalizer and thinlock/syncblock escalation. 
RuntimeHelpers.PrepareConstrainedRegions();
try 
{ 
}
finally 
{
    do
    {
        if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref m_lock, 1, 0) == 0) 
        {
            bLockTaken = true; 
            try 
            {
                if (timerDeleted != 0) 
                    throw new ObjectDisposedException(null, Environment.GetResourceString("ObjectDisposed_Generic"));
                status = ChangeTimerNative(dueTime,period);
            }
            finally 
            {
                m_lock = 0; 
            } 
        }
        Thread.SpinWait(1);     // yield to processor 
    }
    while (!bLockTaken);
}
return status; 

PLEASE NOTE that the ChangeTimerNative calls the ChangeTimerQueueTimer Windows API function so you can read that documentation to get a feel for how it might fail.

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Without showing the detail of ChangeNativeTimer, this doesn't tells us nothing different than the documentation for Timer.Change(). –  Peter Ritchie Sep 25 '12 at 16:53
    
@RichAmberale: ChangeTimerNative calls this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…, which still doesn't give any useful clues. –  Tudor Sep 25 '12 at 16:55
    
@PeterRitchie: see my edit. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 25 '12 at 16:56
    
@mike How do you know ChangeTimerNative calls ChangeTimerQueueTimer? –  Peter Ritchie Sep 25 '12 at 16:58
2  
@PeterRitchie: fair enough, I mean it's not what you know but who you know in this world friend. I guess that just invalidates my answer huh? –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 25 '12 at 17:12

On checking the managed source, the only case in which it returns false is if the AppDomain timer (if one does not exist, it is created) represented by a private class AppDomainTimerSafeHandle - has SafeHandle.IsInvalid set to true.

Since AppDomainTimerSafeHandle inherits from SafeHandleZeroOrMinusOneIsInvalid, IsInvalid is implemented by it - when a timer is attempted to be created by the unmanaged infrastructure and ends up with a Safe-Handle which is reading from the definition Zero-Or-Minus-One-Is-Invalid.

All cases point to this being extremely unlikely.

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Are you talking about the Change method or something else? Change does not create a timer... –  Peter Ritchie Sep 25 '12 at 17:16
    
@PeterRitchie It amounts to an entry in the Timer queue. I've edited it to make it a bit more clearer. –  Asti Sep 25 '12 at 17:37
    
@PeterRitchie I guess I should delete this answer before the downvotefags come along. –  Asti Sep 25 '12 at 17:42
    
It's still not clear how this applies to the Change method. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 25 '12 at 17:42
1  
@PeterRitchie I have no reason to make this up. It's highly likely we're looking at two implementations of the same thing. You are most likely looking in System.dll. –  Asti Sep 25 '12 at 18:05

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