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I have a List<string[]> called lst:

[0] "ABC" "DEF" "GHI"
[1] "JKL" "MNO" "PQR"
[2] etc, etc...

How do I add another string to the end of each lst member?

string s = "EndOfBlock";

[0] "ABC" "DEF" "GHI" "EndOfBlock"
[1] "JKL" "MNO" "PQR" "EndOfBlock"
[2] etc, etc...

Thank you.

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5  
If you want to add items use a List<List<String>>/List(Of List(Of String)). Arrays are fixed sized. –  Tim Schmelter Sep 25 '12 at 16:33
3  
Sounds like you really want a List<List<string>> –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 25 '12 at 16:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As the commenters have noted, it sounds like you really want a List<List<string>>. But if you want to stick with a List<string[]>, here's how I'd expand each array.

List<string[]> list = ...
for(int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
{
    // copy to a local variable (list[i] is a property, which can't be passed 'ref')
    string[] array = list[i];

    // resize the local variable. (this creates a new string[] object)
    Array.Resize(ref array, array.Length + 1);
    array[array.Length - 1] = "EndOfBlock";

    // put the new object back in the list, replacing the old smaller one.
    list[i] = array;
}
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That answers the original question. Thank you. –  user1481183 Sep 25 '12 at 16:53

Should be something like this:

var lst = new List<string[]>();
lst.Add(new string[] { "ABC", "DEF" });
lst.Add(new string[] { "GHI", "JKL" });

foreach (var item in lst)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item.Length);
}

for (int i = 0; i < lst.Count; ++i)
{
    var array = lst[i];
    Array.Resize(ref array, array.Length + 1);
    array[array.Length - 1] = "EndOfBlock";
    lst[i] = array;
}

foreach (var item in lst)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item.Length);
}

Array.Resize Reference

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1  
Array.Resize will create a new array and copy the elements to it. It won't put the new larger array back into the List<>. –  David Yaw Sep 25 '12 at 16:37
    
"This method allocates a new array with the specified size, copies elements from the old array to the new one, and then replaces the old array with the new one." It's getting passed by reference, so it should update in the list as well. –  Gromer Sep 25 '12 at 16:38
1  
Local variable array gets updated, but not the original List. No more than array = null would affect the list. –  David Yaw Sep 25 '12 at 16:38
    
I take that back, @DavidYaw is 100% correct, this will not work. –  Gromer Sep 25 '12 at 16:41
1  
Thank you for your help. –  user1481183 Sep 25 '12 at 16:52

I would also recommand you use a List<List<string>>:

List<List<string>> lst = new List<List<string>>();
lst.ForEach(i=>i.Add("EndOfBlock"));     
share|improve this answer
    
but I wouldn't reccomend using List.ForEach –  Jodrell Sep 25 '12 at 16:46
    
I think using List.ForEach is better than using a for loop in this case, especially since there's only 1 instruction per iteration. –  Francis P Sep 25 '12 at 16:50
    
I'm struggling to justify my first comment so I think you are right. –  Jodrell Sep 25 '12 at 17:06

If you want to keep your list of arrays, you can do this:

List<string[]> lst = new List<string[]); //Where this is the poplated list instead of new;
for (ini i = 0; i < lst.Count; i++)
{
   List<string> tmpList = new List<string>(lst[i]);
   tmpList.Add("EndOfBlock");
   lst[i] = tmpList.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer

If you really want to do this with a IList<string[]> you can do this,

var lst = new List<string[]>
{
    { "ABC", "DEF", "GHI" },
    { "JKL", "MNO", "PQR" },
    ...
}

var blockEnd = new string[] { "EndOfBlock" };

lst = lst.Select(a => 
    (a.Select(s => s).Concat(blockEnd))
    .ToArray()).ToList();

This would be much "nicer" if lst was a Ilist<Ilist<string>>.

var lst = new List<List<string>>
{
    { "ABC", "DEF", "GHI" },
    { "JKL", "MNO", "PQR" },
    ...
}

foreach(var row in lst)
{
   row.Add("EndOfBlock");
}
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