Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What I want to do is simply initialize a instance of a struct. The struct is defined here:

typedef struct Rectangle 
{
tName Name; /* name of the rectangle */
struct Rectangle * binSon[2];
int Center[2];
int Length[2]; /* distance to the boarder of the rectangle */
int Label;
}Rectangle;

and how I initialized it is like below:

Rectangle * binSon[2];
binSon[0] = NULL;
binSon[1] = NULL;

int Center[2];  
int Length[2];

Center[0] = 0;
Center[1] = 0;
Length[0] = 5;
Length[1] = 5;

Rectangle world = {"World", binSon, Center, Length, 0};

at the last line, when I compile the program, it reports me an warning of:

mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without a cast [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: (near initialization for 'world.Name[0]') [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without a cast [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: (near initialization for 'world.Name[1]') [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without a cast [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: (near initialization for 'world.Name[2]') [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without a cast [enabled by default]
mx_cif_ds_manager.c:52:2: warning: (near initialization for 'world.Name[3]') [enabled by default]

Not sure what's going wrong with this piece of program, and wondering if any one has any idea or suggestion that can help me improve this piece of code. Whats a more gental way to initialize a struct?

Thank you

======UPDATE======

Thank you for your help, but what if I want to use variables to initialize a struct. Do I have to malloc a memory space in this case?

The tName definition is here

typedef char tName[MAX_NAME_LEN + 1];
share|improve this question
1  
What is type tName ? – user1201210 Sep 25 '12 at 17:01
    
@Dynguss tName is a fixed length char array – Allan Jiang Sep 25 '12 at 17:01
    
You're trying to initialze with {} which can only be done statically. – Alex Hart Sep 25 '12 at 17:03
    
Show us the declaration of tName. – Keith Randall Sep 25 '12 at 17:07
up vote 10 down vote accepted

This should work:

Rectangle world = {"World", {NULL, NULL}, {0, 0}, {5, 5}, 0};
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for your answer, but I did not see the difference between your answer and mine. it seems like you just put everything in one line. – Allan Jiang Sep 25 '12 at 17:00
2  
@AllanJiang You can't use variables in an initializer list, it has to be literals. – Joachim Pileborg Sep 25 '12 at 17:02
    
@JoachimPileborg Thank you, but what if I want to use variables later, how I can initialize the struct with some variables in this case? – Allan Jiang Sep 25 '12 at 17:07
    
@AllanJiang You're confusing the concepts of initial ization and assignment. You can always assign values to your struct fields later. – Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 19:16

Much simpler:

Rectangle world = { "World", { NULL, NULL }, { 0, 0 }, { 5, 5 }, 0 };
share|improve this answer

To expand on Keith's answer, you could also do this to use your variables if you wanted. Note this is only valid if you are within a function.

void foo(void)
{
    Rectangle world = {"World", {binSon[0], binSon[1]}, {Center[0], Center[1]}, {Length[0], Length[1]}, 0};
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, you can't do that ... the initializers must be constant if the struct is at file scope. And even if you could, it just feeds into the OP's confusion between initialization and assignment. – Jim Balter Sep 25 '12 at 19:18
    
@JimBalter, the OP wasn't explicit about the scope. From the question this could have just as easily been performed in a function (which is what I saw). – Josh Petitt Sep 25 '12 at 19:54
    
@JimBalter and the OP also I don't know if what I posted requires C99. That's what I typically use. It may not work for ANSI C. – Josh Petitt Sep 25 '12 at 19:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.