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Okay, well let's say I have a variable list of items. It can be any number of items. Each item can be either 0,1,2,3, or 4. So I make a loop.

foreach(item in allitems)
{
    if (item == 0) continue;
    do stuff for items 1-4.
}

Let's say that every single item it goes through is 0. Well what if I want to execute a specific line of code in that case? Of course I could do something like

int count = 0
foreach(item in allitems)
{
    if (item == 0) {count++; continue;}
    do stuff for items 1-4.
}
if(count == allitems.Count())
{
    do stuff
}

But I always felt cheap using count variables to do something like this. Is there any thing I can do that doesn't feel like duct-taping a solution together?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's no need to use a count here - just keep a flag which is set if you get past the check, rather than within the check:

bool anyNonZeroItems = false;
foreach(item in allitems)
{
    if (item == 0)
    {
        continue;
    }
    anyNonZeroItems = true;
    // Whatever else
}
if (!anyNonZeroItems)
{
    // Everything was 0 (or the collection was empty)
}
share|improve this answer
    
while I feel like an upstart correcting Jon Skeet :-) the question is for a check when all items match a value not when any item matches the value... –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 25 '12 at 17:11
    
Oh wait - am I an idiot upstart or did the logic reverse since the last time I looked at this? <hangs head in shame /> –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 25 '12 at 17:13
1  
@PaulD'Ambra: (Edited now I've seen the new comment.) Nope, I don't think it changed... –  Jon Skeet Sep 25 '12 at 17:13
    
Yep, too much coffee... too little thinking. Doh! –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 25 '12 at 17:13
    
Great! I never even though of boolean. I feel like I should stop coding forever for that :P –  proseidon Sep 25 '12 at 17:28

You can use Enumerable.All to check if all items in a List satisfy a condition.

in this case something like

if (allItems.All(i => i == 0) {
   //do stuff
}

Incidentally in your example you have (if item = 0) and this should be if (item == 0)

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While this is a very valid suggestion, I hope that the OP was using this as an example for a larger problem. The only issue with using this instead of using a state boolean is that you have to enumerate through a list twice. –  Jaime Torres Sep 25 '12 at 17:06
    
true but beware premature optimisation :-) In this case the list has 5 integers and enumerating it once or twice will be negligible... even with a pretty large list of integers you'll struggle to see an appreciable difference. But you're totally right it depends on the real problem! –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 25 '12 at 17:09
1  
I think we should remember the full quote: "We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%." I'd say a boolean versus a complex function might be in that 3% :) –  Jaime Torres Sep 25 '12 at 17:17

What you currently have is perfectly acceptable. I use that kind of pattern all the time.

One thing I would suggest is making count into a bool unless there's an actually a difference between when count == 11 andcount > 1`

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This is a pretty common problem, but you propose an odd solution. Why not just use a boolean to indicate state?

bool branchExecuted = false;
foreach(item in allitems)
{
    if (item == 0)
    {
      branchExecuted = true; 
      continue;
    }
    //do stuff for items 1-4.
}

if(!branchExecuted)
{
    //do stuff if we never hit that line
}

Using this instead of a LINQ / convenience function to operate on the list will only cost you a single boolean and you only have to iterate over your list once.

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this sets the state flag if any item is 0 not if all values are 0 –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 25 '12 at 17:08
    
You know, his example says you're correct. But his title infers something else. The title says "do something if this line of code never gets executed." His solution does actually solve that, but in the opposite way I would think of it, which would be putting the "special" code in the branch, and the normal code in the base scope of the loop. –  Jaime Torres Sep 25 '12 at 17:12
    
Yep, the question is a little light on detail so I guess we're just imagining why we'd be doing this and solving that problem... especially based on time of day. –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 25 '12 at 17:15

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