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I have a question for this scheme:

class computer_mouse
{
    left_click() { };
    track_wheel() { };
    right_click() { };
}

class game_mouse: public computer_mouse
{
    double_shot() { };
    throw_grenade() { };
    sit_down() { };
}

class design_mouse: public computer_mouse
{
    increase_zoom() { };
    decrease_zoom() { };
}


class computer
{
    computer_mouse *my_mouse;
}

I want to do this:

computer_mouse *my_mouse = new game_mouse();
my_mouse->double_shot();

How can I call a descendant function from a base class?

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Understanding why you want to do this would allow people to respond with the best method of doing this. –  David Schwartz Sep 25 '12 at 17:05
    
your class methods don't have return types? Are you really programming in C++? –  Josh Petitt Sep 25 '12 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to use e.g. static_cast for that:

computer_mouse *my_mouse = new game_mouse();

static_cast<game_mouse*>(my_mouse)->double_shot();

From the above linked Wikipedia page:

The static_cast operator can be used for operations such as

  • Converting a pointer of a base class to a pointer of a derived class,
share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean dynamic_cast? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_cast –  Josh Petitt Sep 25 '12 at 17:13
    
@JoshPetitt See my edited answer. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 25 '12 at 17:19
    
@ JoachimPileBorg, is there any reason you would prefer static_cast to dynamic_cast? In this situation the dynamic_cast is "safer" (although its a bit smelly), right? You get the advantage of RTTI and it will return a NULL pointer if the cast cannot be performed. –  Josh Petitt Sep 25 '12 at 17:25
    
@JoshPetitt Yes dynamic_cast uses RTTI, but remember that the R stands for runtime which means added code by the compiler which is not always wanted. And since dynamic_cast can return nullptr you have to add extra code yourself as well for that check. Also, the compiler will try to make sure that the cast is okay when using static_cast, so in a case like this it's preferable to use static_cast. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 25 '12 at 17:33
    
@ JoachimPileborg I realize the R part. I guess in this case I'd have to resort to "not enough information" :-) I'd personally prefer "safety" over "performance", but either will do. –  Josh Petitt Sep 25 '12 at 17:37

By using static_cast:

static_cast<game_mouse*>(my_mouse)->double_shot();

However, the methods should be public, and not private!

class game_mouse: public computer_mouse
{
public:
    double_shot() { };
    throw_grenade() { };
    sit_down() { };
}
share|improve this answer

Don't do this:

computer_mouse *my_mouse = new game_mouse();
my_mouse->double_shot();

Do this:

game_mouse *my_mouse = new game_mouse();
my_mouse->double_shot();
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