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I was trying to understand why to use exceptions. Suppose if I have an program,

(without using try/catch)

public class ExceptionExample {

private static String str;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(str.length());
}

I got exception

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
at com.Hello.ExceptionExample.ExceptionExample.main(ExceptionExample.java:22)

Now using try/catch,

public class ExceptionExample {

private static String str;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        System.out.println(str.length());
    } catch(NullPointerException npe) {
        npe.printStackTrace();
    }
}

}

I got Exception,

java.lang.NullPointerException
at com.Hello.ExceptionExample.ExceptionExample.main(ExceptionExample.java:9)

Now my question is,

In both the cases I have got the same message printed. So what is the use of using try/catch? and

What can we do after catching exception, in this case I have printed the stack trace. Is catch used only for printing the trace or for finding exception details using getMessage() or getClass()?

share|improve this question
1  
Uncaught exceptions cause the application to terminate abnormally therefore you're better to catch and handle exceptions using the exception handling mechanism whenever possible to prevent unexpected problems/behaviour that may sometimes cause the system to crash. –  Lion Sep 25 '12 at 18:06
    

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The difference is pretty big, actually.

Take the first one and add a line after the print:

public class ExceptionExample {

    private static String str;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(str.length());
        System.out.println("Does this execute?");
    }
}

You'll see that Does this execute? isn't printed because the exception interrupts the flow of the code and stops it when it isn't caught.

On the other hand:

public class ExceptionExample {

    private static String str;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            System.out.println(str.length());
        } catch(NullPointerException npe) {
            npe.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("Does this execute?");
    }
}

Will print both the stack trace and Does this execute?. That's because catching the exception is like saying, "We'll handle this here and continue executing."

One other remark, the catch block is where error recovery should happen, so if an error occurs but we can recover from it, we put the recovery code there.

Edit:

Here's an example of some error recovery. Let's say we have a non-existent file at C:\nonexistentfile.txt. We want to try and open it, and if we can't find it, show the user a message saying it's missing. This could be done by catching the FileNotFoundException produced here:

// Here, we declare "throws IOException" to say someone else needs to handle it
// In this particular case, IOException will only be thrown if an error occurs while reading the file
public static void printFileToConsole() throws IOException {
    File nonExistent = new File("C:/nonexistentfile.txt");
    Scanner scanner = null;
    try {
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(nonExistent);
        while (scanner.hasNextLine()) {
            System.out.println(scanner.nextLine());
        }
    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        // The file wasn't found, show the user a message
        // Note use of "err" instead of "out", this is the error output
        System.err.println("File not found: " + nonExistent);
        // Here, we could recover by creating the file, for example
    } finally {
        if (scanner != null) {
            scanner.close();
        }
    }
}

So there's a few things to note here:

  1. We catch the FileNotFoundException and use a custom error message instead of printing the stack trace. Our error message is cleaner and more user-friendly than printing a stack trace. In GUI applications, the console may not even be visible to the user, so this may be code to show an error dialog to the user instead. Just because the file didn't exist doesn't mean we have to stop executing our code.
  2. We declare throws IOException in the method signature instead of catching it alongside the FileNotFoundException. In this particular case, the IOException will be thrown here if we fail to read the file even though it exists. For this method, we're saying that handling errors we encounter while reading the file isn't our responsibility. This is an example of how you can declare an irrecoverable error (by irrecoverable, I mean irrecoverable here, it may be recoverable somewhere further up, such as in the method that called printFileToConsole).
  3. I accidentally introduced the finally block here, so I'll explain what it does. It guarantees that if the Scanner was opened and an error occurs while we're reading the file, the Scanner will be closed. This is important for many reasons, most notably that if you don't close it, Java will still have the lock on the file, and so you can't open the file again without exiting the application.
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"the catch block is where error recovery should happen, so if an error occurs but we can recover from it, we put the recovery code there." Can u please give me an example on this? –  Che Sep 25 '12 at 18:28
    
@Che I've updated my answer. –  Brian Sep 25 '12 at 18:50

There are two cases when you should throw an exception:

  • When you detect an error caused by incorrect use of your class (i.e. a programming error) throw an instance of unchecked exception, i.e. a subclass of RuntimeException
  • When you detect an error that is caused by something other than a programming error (invalid data, missing network connectivity, and so on) throw an instance of Exception that does not subclass RuntimeException

You should catch exceptions of the second kind, and not of the first kind. Moreover, you should catch exceptions if your program has a course of action to correct the exceptional situation; for example, if you detect a loss of connectivity, your program could offer the user to re-connect to the network and retry the operation. In situations when your code cannot adequately deal with the exception, let it propagate to a layer that could deal with it.

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try/catch will prevent your application from crashing or to be precise- the execution will not stop if an unintentional condition is met. You can wrap your "risky" code in try block and in catch block you can handle that exception. By handling, it means that do something about that condition and move on with execution. Without try/catch the execution stopped at the error-making-line and any code after that will not be executed.

In your case, you could have printed "This was not what I expected, whatever, lets move on!"

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Let's say you are connected to database but while reading the records, it throws some exception. Now in this particular case, you can close the connection in Finally block. You just avoided memory leak here. What I meant to say is , you can perform your task even if exception is thrown by catching and handling it.

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In the example you've given, you're right, there is no benefit.

You should only catch an exception if either

  • You can do something about it (report, add information, fix the situation), or
  • You have to, because a checked exception forces you to

Usual "handling" of an exception is logging the situation to a log file of your choosing, adding any relevant context-sesitive information, and letting the flow go on. Adding contextual information benefits greatly in resolving the issue. So, in your example, you could have done

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        System.out.println(str.length());
    } catch(NullPointerException npe) {
        System.err.println(
           "Tried looking up str.length from internal str variable,"
               +" but we got an exception with message: "
               + npe.getMessage());
        npe.printStackTrace(System.err);
    }
}

when looking a message like that, someone will know based on the message what went wrong and maybe even what might be done to fix it.

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If you are using Exception, don't

 catch(NullPointerException npe) {
    npe.printStackTrace();
}

simply

  catch(NullPointerException npe) {
        //error handling code
    }

You are menat to remove error printing. And anyways catch general exception not just specific ones.

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umm... it's the other way around. you should catch specific ones, not general exceptions. See some more details here. What you should do is that you should catch the most specific exception that you can. –  eis Sep 25 '12 at 18:13
    
Yep, but catch general exceptions at top, if any has been passed uncatched, so we (i am a php programmer) use inherited exception classes to catch specific ones, and then use a global try catch to handle any uncaught ones –  geekman Sep 25 '12 at 18:15
    
this depends on the style of software and I don't think it can be said in general what should be done. For some software, yes, I think it is ok to do that way, but definitely not with all of them. –  eis Sep 25 '12 at 18:19

If you look at the two exceptions, they are actually different. The first one is referring to line 22, while the second one is referring to line 9. It sounds like adding the try/catch caught the first exception, but another line of code also threw an exception.

Consequently, the exception is being thrown because you never created a new String, or set a value to the string, unless it was done in a part of the code that is not shown.

Adding a try/catch block can be very helpful with objects that you have little to no control over, so if these objects are other than expected (such as null), you can handle the issue properly.

A string is normally something that you would instantiate first, so you shouldn't normally have to worry about using a try/catch.

Hope this helps.

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To answer your original question Che, "when to use an exception?"

In Java - I'm sure you've already found out... There are certain methods in Java that REQUIRE the try / catch. These methods "throw" exceptions, and are meant to. There is no way around it.

For example,

FileUtils.readFileToString(new File("myfile.txt"));

won't let you compile until you add the try/catch.

On the other hand, exceptions are very useful because of what you can get from them.

Take Java Reflection for example...

try { Class.forName("MyClass").getConstructor().newInstance(); }
catch ( ClassNotFoundException x ) { // oh it doesnt exist.. do something else with it.

So to answer your question fully -

Use Try/Catch sparingly, as it's typically "frowned on" to EXPECT errors in your application.. on the contrary, use them when your methods require them.

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