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C# - from time to time check if a file exists and read from it

I'm using file watcher to check if a file was craeted in a directory. If it was, then I want to open it and remove to another directory.

My approach is also to use FileShare.None to an ensure exclusive access. What I did is:

class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            FileSystemWatcher fileWatcher = new FileSystemWatcher();
            fileWatcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastAccess | NotifyFilters.LastWrite | NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.DirectoryName;
            fileWatcher.Created += fileWatcher_Created;
            fileWatcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void fileWatcher_Created(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            WorkOnFile(e.FullPath);   
        }


        //must be done completely. How do I ensure it?
        private static void WorkOnFile(string fileName)
        {
            using (FileStream f = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
            {
                Thread.Sleep(40000); // some long operations
            }            
        }
  }

The bottom line is, that it necessary to do WorkOnFile() completely and only one time for one file. If a file being copied, then I need to call WorkOnFile() again until it has completely been copied and none process is using it.

How do I reach it?

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marked as duplicate by Blam, Jon Adams, jonsca, Ja͢ck, 0x7fffffff Sep 26 '12 at 4:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
I think this SO post is trying to achieve more or less the same thing. Or else, can you explain more in details what your problem is : having to know when the created file is done being written so that you can copy it, or something else? –  mbarthelemy Sep 25 '12 at 18:07
    
Create a queue, add "file copy operations" to the queue and have a consumer thread. If a file copy fails, reenqueue the copy request to the queue. –  Patrick Sep 25 '12 at 18:13
    
Yes, exactly - having to know when the created file is done being written –  Grienders Sep 25 '12 at 18:14
    
@mbarthelemy, SO post seems to be pretty complex to implement. –  Grienders Sep 25 '12 at 18:17
2  
@Grienders I admit it's not that easy, but unfortunately, I don't know a way to be sure a created file is done being written by simply relying on Filesystemwatcher. Another cheaper solution would be putting your File.Open inside a try/catch block, and loop (maybe sleeping for a few seconds) until no exception is thrown, which would mean that the file is released by its creator and thus free to be accessed. –  mbarthelemy Sep 25 '12 at 18:23

2 Answers 2

If you need that file moved as fast as possible, you could try using FileWatcher to monitor 'LastWrite' and after a small delay, trying to move the file.

I had to do something very similar, but there was no hurry, just important that the file was moved reliably. So I instead used a System.Timers.Timer to run once a minute:

var scanDirectoryIn = new DirectoryInfo(folderIn);
foreach (var fileInfo in scanDirectoryIn.GetFiles())
{
  if (fileInfo.Extension != ".csv") continue;
  if (DateTime.UtcNow.Subtract(fileInfo.LastWriteTimeUtc).TotalMinutes < 5) continue;
  try
  {
    fileInfo.MoveTo(folderOut + "\\" + fileInfo.Name);
  }
  catch (Exception) {}
}
share|improve this answer
//must be done completely. How do I ensure it?
    private static void WorkOnFile(string fileName)
    {
        while(true){
            try{
                using (FileStream f = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(40000); // some long operations

                    break; //exit while() infinite loop
                }
            }
            catch(Exception e){
                //file is locked because being written. wait a few seconds then retry
                Thread.Sleep(10000);
            }     
        }       
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I would rather use do ... while –  Grienders Sep 25 '12 at 18:42
1  
Feel free to do so ;-) Do you consider that me or someone else answered your question? –  mbarthelemy Sep 25 '12 at 19:19

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