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In the process of building a JavaScript interpreter for a simple language, I've faced the following problem;

After parsing, we get an array of indices that specifies the element in an n-dimensional array to be modified. For instance, after parsing this:

a[1, 1, 1]

We get an array [1, 1, 1]. The language I'm working on doesn't have variable definitions, so variables get initialized on their first use. My goal is to be able to create this n-dimensional array so that I can place it in the variable table (in the example above, we'd need to create a 3-dimensional array).

The short question:

Is there a way to create an n-dimensional array in JavaScript without using eval()?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Untested:

function createNDimArray(dimensions) {
    if (dimensions.length > 0) {
        var dim = dimensions[0];
        var rest = dimensions.slice(1);
        var newArray = new Array();
        for (i = 0; i < dim; i++) {
            newArray[i] = createNDimArray(rest);
        }
        return newArray;
     } else {
        return undefined;
     }
 }

Then createNDimArray([3, 2, 5]) should return a 3x2x5 array.

You can use a similar recursive procedure to access an element whose index is in an array:

function getElement(array, indices) {
    if (indices == 0) {
        return array;
    } else {
        return getElement(array[indices[0]], indices.slice(1));
    }
 }

Setting an element is similar, and left as an exercise for the reader.

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I hate posting the same comment on two answers, but, like I said to @Pete: how would you access a specific element in the already-created array? –  Chris Sep 25 '12 at 18:21
    
One suggestion: I think null is a better default value than undefined. That way it's easy to test whether you're outside the bounds of the array or just getting an empty value. But the OP doesn't specify, so undefined might be what he/she wants. –  Pete Sep 25 '12 at 18:23
    
See my edit for accessing elements. And it would be trivial to make the default element a parameter to the creation function. –  Barmar Sep 25 '12 at 18:28
    
@Barmar Yeah, that'll do it. Thanks! –  Chris Sep 25 '12 at 18:32
    
The getElement-function seems to be not correct, slice is not defined. –  yckart Apr 29 '13 at 12:07
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There's nothing built in, but it's pretty easy to create a function that would do the job:

var genArray = function () {
    var arr, len, i;
    if(arguments.length > 0) {
        len = [].slice.call(arguments, 0, 1)[0];
        arr = new Array(len);
        for(i = 0; i < len; i++) {
            arr[i] = genArray.apply(null, [].slice.call(arguments, 1));
        }
    } else {
        return null; //or whatever you want to initialize values to.
    }
    return arr;
};

var a = genArray(3, 2); //is [[null, null],[null, null],[null, null]]
var b = genArray(3, 1, 1); //is [[[null]],[[null]],[[null]]]

a[0][1]; //is null
b[1][0][0]; //is null
b[1][0][0] = 3;
b[1][0][0]; //is 3;
b; //is [[[null]],[[3]],[[null]]]

Maybe that will help?

PS --

I know this might seem like more effort than is necessary. But unfortunately, JavaScript arrays are not really "arrays" (if by "array" you mean a contiguous, indexed, immutable memory block). They're more like "maps" in most languages. So there's a certain amount of effort involved in creating them. Most languages have no problem creating multi-dimensional arrays because they're just doing some simple multiplication followed by an malloc(). But with JavaScript, you really have to go recursively generate your arrays if you want to have them pre-constructed. It's a pain, but it does demonstrate the effort required by the interpreter.

Go figure.

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Clever; thanks. One more thing, though, how would you access a specific element in the already-created array? –  Chris Sep 25 '12 at 18:20
    
I mean, since we don't know how many indices we'll actually be dealing with. –  Chris Sep 25 '12 at 18:23
    
@Abody97 Updated my code -- does that answer your question? –  Pete Sep 25 '12 at 18:26
    
Hmm, not precisely. Suppose we've created the array, and then we're be faced with another array of indices [a, b, c]. How would you go on actually looking up array[a][b][c]? The main issue is that you don't know how many indices there will be. I know it can be done using eval(), but I hope there's a less-ugly solution. –  Chris Sep 25 '12 at 18:29
    
@Abody97 Check Barmar's update to his answer. It will work on arrays generated by my code, also. –  Pete Sep 25 '12 at 18:30
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For creating an n-dimensional array:

function createNDimArray(dimensions) {
 var ret = undefined;
 if(dimensions.length==1){
    ret = new Array(dimensions[0]);
    for (var i = 0; i < dimensions[0]; i++)
        ret[i]=null; //or another value
    return ret;     
 }
 else{
    //recursion
    var rest = dimensions.slice(1);
    ret = new Array(dimensions[0]);
    for (var i = 0; i < dimensions[0]; i++)
        ret[i]=createNDimArray(rest);       
    return ret;
 }
}
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