Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to prevent deletion of all rows in a table? I know how to user DDL triggers to prevent dropping a table or truncation. I once failed to highlight the entire commmand, leaving off the where clause, and deleted all rows in a table. I want to prevent this from occurring again unless a where clause is present.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You could do this with a trigger.

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.KeepRows
ON dbo.TableName
FOR DELETE
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM dbo.TableName)
  BEGIN
    RAISERROR('Naughty developer, you tried to delete the last row!', 11, 1);
    ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;
  END
END
GO

In order to avoid the delete and then rollback, which can be quite expensive if the table is large, you could instead implement this as an instead of trigger, which will prevent any work from happening (except the check of course). This assumes the column id is the primary key:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.KeepRows2
ON dbo.TableName
INSTEAD OF DELETE
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM dbo.TableName WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM deleted))
  BEGIN
    DELETE dbo.TableName WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM deleted);
  END
  -- optional:
  ELSE
  BEGIN
    RAISERROR('Nice try, you need a WHERE clause!', 11, 1);
  END
END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to use column notation in the INSTEAD OF example, again using an assumption that column 0 would be the PK even if not named id? –  UserBlueOne Sep 25 '12 at 18:43
    
@UserBlueOne are you saying you don't know the name of the column? No, you need to name the column that serves as the primary/unique key; you can't use ordinal position. I suppose you could perform a count on both tables but I would much rather identify by key. These triggers would be fairly easy to generate in an automated way as long as your tables all have single-column primary keys. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 25 '12 at 18:53
    
I will know the name of the PK but was just curious if ordinal values could be used. –  UserBlueOne Sep 25 '12 at 18:55
    
No, the only place you can ever reference columns as ordinals is when using ORDER BY - and I don't recommend that anyway - and even then it is an ordinal of the output columns, not of any table. Even if it were possible here, I would recommend strongly against it. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 25 '12 at 18:56
2  
@UserBlueOne No, what do you need the count for? You're trying to determine if there are 0 or more than 0 rows left in the table, correct? So what does it matter if the count is 1, 5, 22, or 600 million? COUNTs are expensive to retrieve, and you should only do so when you actually need to. In this case, you don't. I suggest trying both of these triggers against small test tables. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 25 '12 at 18:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.