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I'm preparing for the SCJP (recently rebranded as OCPJP by Oracle) and one particular question that I got wrong on a mock exam has confused me, the answer description doesn't explain things clear enough.

This is the question :

class A 
{
    int x = 5;
} 
class B extends A 
{
    int x = 6;
} 
public class CovariantTest 
{
    public A getObject() 
    {
       return new A();
    } 
    public static void main(String[]args) 
    {
       CovariantTest c1 = new SubCovariantTest();
       System.out.println(c1.getObject().x);
    }
}

class SubCovariantTest extends CovariantTest 
{
    public B getObject() 
    {
       return new B();
    }
}

The answer is 5, but I chose 6.

I understand that overriding applies to methods at runtime, and not variables, but the way my mind interpreted that println was :

  1. call getObject on c1
  2. c1 is actually a SubCovariantTest object, and has a valid override for getObject(), so use the overridden method
  3. The override returns B, so grab x from B which is 6

Is it a case of the JVM ignoring the getObject() part, and always taking x from c1 as variables are associated at compile time?

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Having typed the code up, why not run it and see that it returns 5? –  Don Roby Sep 25 '12 at 18:58
    
i also see that it will return 5 not 6!! –  Java Player Sep 26 '12 at 9:49
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3 Answers

Although the override is done properly for SubCovariantTest the answer is 5 because of how the variable c1 is declared. It is declared as a CovariantTest and not as a SubCovariantTest.

When c1.getObject().x is run, it does not know that it is a SubCovariantTest (no casting was used). This is why 5 is returned from CovariantTest and not 6 from SubCovariantTest.

If you change

System.out.println(c1.getObject().x);

to

System.out.println(((SubCovariantTest) c1).getObject().x);

you will get 6 as you expected.

Edit: As pointed out in the comments

"fields are not polymorphic in Java. Only methods are. The x in the subclass hides the x in the base class. It doesn't override it." (Thanks to JB Nizet)

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1  
Are you sure? I'm pretty sure the whole point of polymorphism is to be able to do something like this: Paint[] paint = { new RedPaint(), new BluePaint(), new GreenPaint() };' and then have for(Paint p : paint) paint.getColor();` where each subclass of Paint has a valid override for getColor(). Each should perform differently regardless of knowing the subclass or needing to cast to it. –  Jeff Gohlke Sep 25 '12 at 18:57
5  
Yes, but fields are not polymorphic in Java. Only methods are. The x in the subclass hides the x in the base class. It doesn't override it. And besides encapsulation, that's another good reason NOT to use public fields. –  JB Nizet Sep 25 '12 at 18:58
    
Oh, I see. Interesting! I never knew that. You should add that to the answer. :) –  Jeff Gohlke Sep 25 '12 at 18:59
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You are calling method from c1: System.out.println(c1.getObject().x);

c1 reference type is:

public class CovariantTest 
{
    public A getObject() 
    {
       return new A();
    } 
    public static void main(String[]args) 
    {
       CovariantTest c1 = new SubCovariantTest();
       System.out.println(c1.getObject().x);
    }
}

so for this: c1.getObject() return type is A. from A you getting directly attribute not method, as you mention java does not override attributes, so it is grabbing x from A

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The technical term for what is happening here is "hiding". Variables names in Java are resolved by the reference type, not the object they are referencing.

  • A object has a A.x variable.
  • B object has both A.x and B.x variables.

However instance methods with the same signature are "overridden" not "hidden", and you cannot access the version of a method that is overridden from the outside.

Note that hiding also applies to static methods with the same signature.

Your mock question in a simplified form (without overriding):

class A {
    int x = 5;
}

class B extends A {
    int x = 6;
}

public class CovariantTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        A a = new B();
        B b = new B();
        System.out.println(a.x); // prints 5
        System.out.println(b.x); // prints 6

    }
}
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