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With SQL Server 2005 Express (obeserved on XP and Server 2003), I get sometimes huge Error logs files in production: The file C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL.1\MSSQL\LOG\ERRORLOG grows to fill the disk (file size becomes more than 15 GB).

This file is not the transaction log, just the error log : a text log for SQL Server.

The error log starts like this: (seems to be normal)

2009-01-11 09:16:57.04 spid51      Starting up database 'SDomain'. 
2009-01-11 10:04:34.21 spid21s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'Object Plans' cachestore (part of plan cache) due  
to some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 10:04:34.23 spid21s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'SQL Plans' cachestore (part of plan cache) due to  
some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 10:04:34.23 spid21s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'Bound Trees' cachestore (part of plan cache) due t 
o some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 10:08:37.32 spid51      Starting up database 'SDomain'. 
2009-01-11 10:56:55.48 spid22s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'Object Plans' cachestore (part of plan cache) due  
to some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 10:56:55.49 spid22s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'SQL Plans' cachestore (part of plan cache) due to  
some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 10:56:55.49 spid22s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'Bound Trees' cachestore (part of plan cache) due t 
o some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 11:00:07.51 spid51      Starting up database 'SDomain'. 
2009-01-11 11:47:44.73 spid15s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'Object Plans' cachestore (part of plan cache) due  
to some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 11:47:44.74 spid15s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'SQL Plans' cachestore (part of plan cache) due to  
some database maintenance or reconfigure operations. 
2009-01-11 11:47:44.74 spid15s     SQL Server has encountered 1 occurrence(s) of cachestore flush for the 'Bound Trees' cachestore (part of plan cache) due t 
o some database maintenance or reconfigure operations.

Then the file seems to contain endlessly repeating lines like this:

2008-12-17 00:12:24.03 spid13s     The log for database 'SDomain' is not available. Check the event log for related error messages. Resolve any errors and restart the database**

FYI, the windows eventlog contains exactly the same messages.

Any idea of the reason why this problem occurs? Could it be a particular issue of configuration of SQL Server? Or an issue in code causing this?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a database named SDomain that is set to auto-close. Whenever is accessed, it is 'started'. Recently you, or someone near you, deleted or moved the LDF file of the database. When the process that is accessing the SDomdain database is trying to open it, SQL Server will complain about the problem in the ERRORLOG. Give the database back its LDF and will stop complaining. Execute sp_cycle_errorlog to start a new ERRORLOG file so you can delete the old one.

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Maybe this can help? http://support.microsoft.com/kb/917828

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The problem is not a performance problem (described in link to MS KB) : the result in a non functional SQL Server, and filling the disk with a huge useless file, possibly taking down the OS too. – olorin Aug 11 '09 at 12:53

The common reasons why a database would start recovering on its own are:

  • The SQL Service was shutdown from the Service Control Manager or due a server shutdown
  • A fatal error occurred on the database which forced SQL Server to shut down the database and recover it
  • Someone manually initiated a recovery on the database using RESTORE WITH RECOVERY command
  • A database backup was restored onto the database During this phase your database will not respond to any user requests. Only once the recovery phase is complete will the database be accessible to users. To find out why this happened you might want to check the SQL Server ERRORLOG and find out what find right before the recovery started on the database. Any fatal errors or database restore operations would be logged in the SQL Server ERRORLOG. Also check if Auto Close option is enabled for your database. If thats true you need to turn off that option as follows,
    1. Right click the database.
    2. Select Properties
    3. Click on Options.
    4. AutoClose is the first option and ensure that it is marked as False.
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1  
Please don't rip answers from other sites unattributed. – JNK Jun 2 '11 at 20:41
1  
Answer ripped from here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/sqldatabaseengine/thread/… – JNK Jun 2 '11 at 20:41

Ensure user account servername\SQLServer2005MSSQLUser$servername$SQLEXPRESS has write access to the directory that your database is residing in.

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This is clearly not the answer, given that the accepted answer solved the problem. – itsbruce Nov 16 '12 at 21:04

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