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I have never used RequireJS before, so any help would be appreciated. I have the following HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" 
        data-main="CustomScripts/market-need" 
        src="CustomScripts/require.js"></script>
<meta content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv="Content-Type" />
<title>Untitled 1</title>
</head>
<body>
etc...
</body>
</html>

I have the following JavaScript defined in CustomScripts/market-need.js.

(function(){
    requirejs.config({ baseUrl: 'CustomScripts' });

    require(['mndataservice'],
        function (mndataservice) {
            mndataservice.getListData();
        });
})();

And the following code saved in CustomScripts/mndataservice.js.

define([], function () {
    function getListData() {
            alert("Hit");
        }

    return
    {
        getListData: getListData
    };
});

Whenever I run the above, mndataservice is undefined when it hits the mndataservice.getListData(); line in the market-need.js. This worked at one point, I and I cannot find the error I have made for the life of me.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you change:

function (mndataservice) {
    mndataservice.getListData();
});

to:

function (mndataservice) {
    this.mndataservice.getListData();
});

and then also replace the contents of mndataservice.js with:

var mndataservice = {
    getListData: function () {
        alert("Hit");
    }
};

I think it will fix it for you.

Update:

Simply changing mndataservice.js to:

define([], function () {
    return {
        getListData: function () {
            alert("Hit");
        }
    }
});

should fix it. Do not add "this." in the other function.

Update

Following up on your question below that asked why your example didn't work and mine did. The reason yours didn't work - your code is actually doing this:

define([], function () {
    function getListData() {
            alert("Hit");
        }

    return;
    {
        getListData: getListData
    };
});

Note the semicolon right after the return keyword. Though not in your code, it gets inserted automatically by Javascript's Automatic Semicolon Insertion which causes it to return undefined rather than the object.

Moving the open curly brace up to same line as return fixes it!

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but my intent was to use the revealing module pattern with the mndataservice. Any explanation as to why that was incorrect? I was looking at the examples here: requirejs.org/docs/api.html#define –  Robert Kaucher Sep 25 '12 at 20:48
    
See update above. I think it will fix it with only a minor change to mndataservice.js required, which still uses that revealing module pattern. –  Mindwalker2076 Sep 25 '12 at 20:59
    
The final example doesn't work. I don't like the fact that using RequireJS is descending into magic. Say the words in this order, sacrifice a chicken, maybe it will work! ;-) –  Robert Kaucher Sep 25 '12 at 21:19
1  
That's strange. I tried the code in at least 3 different browsers (Chrome,Safari,Firefox) and it seems to work. Also on IE earlier. Have you tried refreshing your cache? –  Mindwalker2076 Sep 26 '12 at 0:51
1  
Are you asking why does Javascript have the automatic semicolon insertion mechanism? I'm not really sure of the reasoning, but its effect is to make semicolons optional, as long as one separates statements with <cr>'s, but with horribly horrible unintended consequences like the example you showed. It can really bite programmers like me with backgrounds in C style languages who are used to being able to place opening braces either on the same or next line and have it work the same either way. I would recommend reading the Automatic Semicolon Insertion link above for more info. –  Mindwalker2076 Sep 27 '12 at 19:43

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