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I want a source controlled environment for a fairly large amount of database data, in text, before its loaded into the DBMS. We've been using GITHUB and its great. But they expect that a repository is less than 1 gigabyte and we have hundreds.

It could be in CVS or SVN, but tracking versions is important. The data is very static and is accessed only at low rates, say once a week for parts of it, once a month for more.

Any suggested places/services that do this? It doesn't have to be free, we'll happily pay a reasonable amount.

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why do you need a service? buy some TB harddiscs. also i don't see how this relates to programming.. probably should be migrated to superuser. –  Gung Foo Sep 25 '12 at 20:38
    
Amazon EC2 server with S3 backup? Really depends on your usage patterns and what you're willing to pay. –  parsifal Sep 25 '12 at 20:40
    
I need it to be backed up, offsite, etc. Its only programming because I'm a programmer and I have the problem. –  fishtoprecords Sep 25 '12 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

I confirm this kind of amount of data is incompatible with a Version Control System (made to record the history, ie the evolution of mostly text files and small binary files)

It is certainly not compatible with a Distributed VCS, where any clone would clone all the repo.

You need to look at cloud services for this type of storage.


The OP protests (downvote), stating that:

They would be normal ASCII except that GitHub has such small file size limits that I ran them through ZIP compression.
They rarely change, and when the contents change, its just a tiny number of lines within the file.
Its exactly what version control is about. Which 0.005% of the ASCII changed? Who changed it? When?

I maintain that:

  • hundreds of megabytes is incompatible with most source control repo providers out there (it would even be incompatible with most internal enterprise repos, and I am in a large company)
  • putting them in a zip file isn't practical in that a Version Control Tool system wouldn't be able to record the delta.

You need to keep separate:

  • the data (stores "elsewhere" as a large content of plain text files, certainly not on GitHub)
  • the metadata you want (author, date of modification), stored in a regular git repo in association with "shell" data (ie, your files which are actually "references", or kind of "symlinks" to, the actual files put elsewhere)

The one system, based on Git, who provides that is git-annex, using your own cloud storage with (if implemented) git-annex assistant: see its roadmap.

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These are text files. They would be normal ASCII except that github has such small file size limits that I ran them through ZIP compression. They rarely change, and when the contents change, its just a tiny number of lines within the file. Its exactly what version control is about. Which 0.005% of the ASCII changed? Who changed it? When? –  fishtoprecords Sep 29 '12 at 2:16
    
@fishtoprecords answer edited –  VonC Sep 29 '12 at 8:35

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