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I read docs about java recorsion and I thought I have understood it, but when I try to use it in the following example, it does not work as expected.

I a class account, which has amount and can have forther subAccount. I would have implemented one method getSum, which has to return the summ of the amount of the account and amount of all of its subaccount. In the following code, the call of the method getSumm() should return 550, but it behaves strange. can somebody help please?

public class Balance{
    ArrayList<Balance> subAccounts = new ArrayList<Balance>();
    String accountID = null;
    Double amount = null;
    double result=0;
    public double getSum(ArrayList<Balance> subAccounts){

        if(subAccounts !=null && subAccounts.size()>0){
            for (int i = 0; i < subAccounts.size(); i++) {

            result = result + getSum(subAccounts.get(i).subAccounts);

            }
        }
            else {
                return amount;
            }

        return result;
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Balance bs1 = new Balance();
        Balance bs2 = new Balance();
        Balance bs3 = new Balance();

        bs1.amount=100.0;
        bs2.amount=150.0;
        bs3.amount=300.0;
        ArrayList<Balance> subAccounts1 = new ArrayList<Balance>();

        bs2.subAccounts=null;
        bs3.subAccounts=null;
        subAccounts1.add(bs2);
        subAccounts1.add(bs3);
        bs1.subAccounts=subAccounts1;
        double sum= bs1.getSum(subAccounts1);
        System.out.println(sum);

}

}
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closed as not a real question by Jim Garrison, PeeHaa, ronalchn, John Conde, Lucifer Sep 27 '12 at 2:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
How is it acting "strange"? Is it giving the wrong answer, like 450 for instance? –  hatchet Sep 25 '12 at 21:31
    
@hatchet read the question. it's obvious why it's not right. –  Nicholas DiPiazza Sep 25 '12 at 21:35
    
lol, everyone is posting their solution and getting marked by the voting system. it reminds me of when i did my computer course. –  gigadot Sep 25 '12 at 21:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your logic was a little iffy.

The getSum shouldn't take an argument because the subAccounts member variable is part of the object already.

Also you were collecting the internal sum in a member variable. Use local variables to avoid problems.

As everyone has everyone has already said... make sure you are not actually using recursion for this. This is simply a demonstration of how to use recusion so that is ok.

Here is the corrected program:

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Balance {
    ArrayList<Balance> subAccounts = new ArrayList<Balance>();
    String accountID = null;
    Double amount = null;

    public double getSum() {
        if (subAccounts != null) {
            Double sum = 0.0;
            for (int i = 0; i < subAccounts.size(); i++) {
                sum += subAccounts.get(i).getSum();
            }
            return amount + sum;
        } else {
            return amount;
        }       
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Balance bs1 = new Balance();
        Balance bs2 = new Balance();
        Balance bs3 = new Balance();
        bs1.amount = 100.0;
        bs2.amount = 150.0;
        bs3.amount = 300.0;
        ArrayList<Balance> subAccounts1 = new ArrayList<Balance>();
        bs2.subAccounts = null;
        bs3.subAccounts = null;
        subAccounts1.add(bs2);
        subAccounts1.add(bs3);
        bs1.subAccounts = subAccounts1;
        double sum = bs1.getSum();
        System.out.println(sum);
    }
}
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You are complicating things by not properly encapsulating. This means that you must pass in the correct parameters to getSum(...), and since you might pass in the wrong parameter, the lack of encapsulation combined with the wrong parameter assures the wrong answer.

The key is to stop requiring that the caller needs to know anything about how getSum(...) works. An account should be able to calculate its own sum without assistance. After all, an account should already have the data inside the class, so why require someone else to tell it that data?

public class Account {

   // A list of subAccounts, each which
   // is responsible for its own value.
   private List<Account> subAccounts;

   // value in this account, not assigned
   // to subAccounts
   private double value;

   public double getSum() {
     double sum = this.value;
     for (Account account : subAccounts) {
       sum += account.getSum();
     }
     return sum;
   }

}
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2  
+1. Once the API is correct, the implementation becomes obvious. –  JB Nizet Sep 25 '12 at 21:36
    
If that's not an established quotation, it should be. –  Edwin Buck Sep 25 '12 at 22:16

One of your termination conditions for getSum is

return amount;

Where amount is a class scoped variable. That's probably not what you intend. You should probably be returning result.

Also, result is defined as a class scoped variable. It should be local to getSum.

share|improve this answer
    
And the list of subAccounts should not be an argument of the method. An account knows its sub-accounts. –  JB Nizet Sep 25 '12 at 21:33

Here is a working, much simpler and safer version:

public double getSum(){
    double result = this.amount;
    if(this.subAccounts !=null){
        for (Balance subAccount : this.subAccounts) {
            result = result + subAccount.getSum();
        }
    }
    return result;
}

You call it with simple: bs1.getSum(). The idea is simple in intuitive: sum is the amount + sum of the amounts of all sub accounts.

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SEE Nicholas's answer for a more complete answer

Try

double sum= bs1.getSum(bs1);

This is not intuitive.. but will give you the answer you want. You should restructure your getSum() a little bit to get an intuitive function.

Also, you need to change the last return to :

    return result + amount;
share|improve this answer
    
is bs1 a correct argument for his implementation of getSum? –  Zlatko Sep 25 '12 at 21:44

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