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What I would like to know about the code below, is: Are the use of try catch blocks around method calls good practice. What are the follies in the code below?

#ifndef TIMER_H
#define TIMER_H

#include <boost/bind/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/recursive_mutex.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/make_shared.hpp>

#include <stdint.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds>
class Timer {
private:
    static Timer *_instance;
    uint32_t mMilliSeconds;
    boost::mutex mListMutex;
    boost::thread mTimerThread;
    std::vector<boost::function<void()> > mHandlerList;

    Timer();
    Timer(const Timer &other);
    Timer &operator=(const Timer &other);
    void Run();

public:
    ~Timer();
    static boost::shared_ptr<Timer<tMilliSeconds> > Instance();
    void AddHandler(boost::function<void()> tmpBoostFunction);
};

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds>
Timer<tMilliSeconds>::Timer() :
    mListMutex() {
    mMilliSeconds = tMilliSeconds;

    mTimerThread = boost::thread(
        boost::bind(&Timer<tMilliSeconds>::Run, this));
}

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds>
Timer<tMilliSeconds>::~Timer()  {
    mListMutex.lock();
    try {
        mTimerThread.detach();
    } catch (...) {
        mListMutex.unlock();
    }
    mListMutex.unlock();
}

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds>
boost::shared_ptr<Timer<tMilliSeconds> >
Timer<tMilliSeconds>::Instance() {
    if (!_instance) {
        _instance = new Timer<tMilliSeconds>();
    }
    return boost::shared_ptr<Timer<tMilliSeconds> >(_instance);
}

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds>
void Timer<tMilliSeconds>::Run() {
    while(true) {
        boost::this_thread::sleep(
            boost::posix_time::milliseconds(mMilliSeconds));
        mListMutex.lock();
        for (std::vector<boost::function<void()> >::iterator vect_it =
            mHandlerList.begin(); vect_it != mHandlerList.end();
            ++vect_it) {
            try {
                (*vect_it)();
            } catch (...) {
                mListMutex.unlock();
            }
        }
        mListMutex.unlock();
    }
}

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds>
void Timer<tMilliSeconds>::AddHandler(
    boost::function<void()> tmpBoostFunction) {

    mListMutex.lock();
    try {
        mHandlerList.push_back(tmpBoostFunction);
    } catch (...) {
        mListMutex.unlock();
    }
    mListMutex.unlock();
}
#endif // TIMER_H
share|improve this question
1  
This belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com. –  orlp Sep 25 '12 at 21:55
    
This is not a review it is an explicit question with code. –  Matthew Hoggan Sep 25 '12 at 22:05
    
OK, then where does help on "other follies" go? A separate answer that can never be accepted? Oh well. Your shared_ptr usage isn't right... creating a new shared_ptr from a plain pointer for each call means that each of your shared_ptr returns will not be actually shared. Store instance as a shared_ptr instead. I don't think detach() does what you think it does. Presumably you want to exit the thread. For that you'll want a termination condition (or interruption), and a join() in the destructor. –  Peter Sep 26 '12 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you're using boost, I would look into using a mutex in conjuction with a boost::scoped_lock, so that when the scoped_lock object goes out of scope, the mutex is "automagically" unlocked via its destructor call. You then won't need to worry about interleaving mutex unlocking with your try and catch blocks, since the unwinding of the stack via an exception will release the lock on the mutex via the scoped_lock object.

share|improve this answer
    
This "scoped mutex" is called an AutoMutex by some. In Qt it is a QMutexLocker. –  phyatt Sep 25 '12 at 21:59
    
@Jason scoped mutex is causing my program to lock were as my implementation does not. What might be the cause of this? –  Matthew Hoggan Sep 25 '12 at 22:47
    
If the problem is re-entrancy, then make sure to use a re-entrant type mutex with the scoped_lock object. The scoped lock is separate from the mutex type, so this type of abstraction works well for those scenarios. –  Jason Sep 26 '12 at 0:24
    
I don't see anywhere in your code where one function that holds a lock would call another function that also wants a lock. A scoped_lock implementation would do exactly the same thing as your code, except with correct operation on errors. Perhaps your scoped_lock usage isn't correct? –  Peter Sep 26 '12 at 15:11

No, your use of catch blocks is wrong. If exceptions do occur, you are causing more unlocks then you should be. If lock() is successful then call unlock() once and only once. You should use a lock wrapper that manages the unlock for you, eg:

class mutex_lock
{
private:
    boost::mutex &mListMutex; 
public:
    mutex_lock(boost::mutex &aListMutex) : mListMutex(aListMutex) { mListMutex.lock(); }
    ~mutex_lock() { mListMutex.unlock(); }
};

Then you can do this:

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds> 
Timer<tMilliSeconds>::~Timer()
{ 
    mutex_lock lock(mListMutex); 
    mTimerThread.detach(); 
} 

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds> 
void Timer<tMilliSeconds>::Run()
{ 
    while(true) { 
        boost::this_thread::sleep(
            boost::posix_time::milliseconds(mMilliSeconds)); 
        mutex_lock lock(mListMutex); 
        for (std::vector<boost::function<void()> >::iterator vect_it = mHandlerList.begin(); vect_it != mHandlerList.end(); ++vect_it) { 
            (*vect_it)(); 
        } 
    } 
} 

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds> 
void Timer<tMilliSeconds>::AddHandler( 
    boost::function<void()> tmpBoostFunction)
{ 
    mutex_lock lock(mListMutex); 
    mHandlerList.push_back(tmpBoostFunction); 
} 

Update: boost has its own scoped_lock class for this exact same purpose:

#include <boost/interprocess/sync/scoped_lock.hpp>

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds> 
Timer<tMilliSeconds>::~Timer()
{ 
    boost::interprocess::scoped_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mListMutex); 
    mTimerThread.detach(); 
} 

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds> 
void Timer<tMilliSeconds>::Run()
{ 
    while(true) { 
        boost::this_thread::sleep(
            boost::posix_time::milliseconds(mMilliSeconds)); 
        boost::interprocess::scoped_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mListMutex); 
        for (std::vector<boost::function<void()> >::iterator vect_it = mHandlerList.begin(); vect_it != mHandlerList.end(); ++vect_it) { 
            (*vect_it)(); 
        } 
    } 
} 

template <uint32_t tMilliSeconds> 
void Timer<tMilliSeconds>::AddHandler( 
    boost::function<void()> tmpBoostFunction)
{ 
    boost::interprocess::scoped_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mListMutex); 
    mHandlerList.push_back(tmpBoostFunction); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
The scoped_lock is leading to what I feared and that was a non-recursive mutex begin locked multiple times. My code does not lead to that. –  Matthew Hoggan Sep 25 '12 at 23:04
    
You are not using a boost::recursive_mutex in the code you showed, even though you are including the recursive_mutex.hpp header file. I don't know the difference between boost::mutex and boost::recursive_mutex, but on Windows at least, boost::mutex maps to CRITICAL_SECTION, which can be locked recursively within the same thread context. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 25 '12 at 23:07

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