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I am reading a csv into a list, and I need to delete an entire line from the list under a specific condition:

import csv

thefile = []

def dowork():
    sourceFile='e.csv'
    CleanFile(sourceFile)

def CleanFile(sourceFile):
    global thefile
    thefile=list(csv.reader(open(sourceFile, 'rb'), delimiter=',', quotechar='"'))
    for line in thefile:
        if line[3]=='':
            #here's where i need to delete line from thefile

how would i delete line from thefile?

share|improve this question
    
One quick thing: if line[3]='': won't work; you're using assignment (=) rather than comparison (==). Also, are you sure you want to compare it to the empty string? That's never going to be true. If you're looking for the equivalent of the C line[3] == '\0' the best way to do that is len(line) == 3. –  abarnert Sep 25 '12 at 22:27
    
@abarnert thank you for correction!!!! –  Yuck Sep 25 '12 at 22:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need the index of line within thefile. Once you have that, it's easy. And the way you get that is with enumerate.

def CleanFile(sourceFile):
    global thefile
    thefile=list(csv.reader(open(sourceFile, 'rb'), delimiter=',', quotechar='"'))
    for i, line in enumerate(thefile):
        if line[3]=='':
            del thefile[i]

However, it's worth asking whether you actually need to delete it. For example, could you just filter it out like this?

def CleanFile(sourceFile):
    global thefile
    thefile=[line for line in 
             csv.reader(open(sourceFile, 'rb'), delimiter=',', quotechar='"')) 
             if line[3] != '']

Or, depending on what you're doing with the data, maybe it makes even more sense to just skip over lines where line[3] == '' at output or calculation time. Or, even better, don't make a list in the first place; just leave csv.reader as an iterator—then you can stick a filter in front of it via itertools.ifilter, or a generator expression. In fact, that's as simple as just changing two characters:

def CleanFile(sourceFile):
    global thefile
    thefile=(line for line in 
             csv.reader(open(sourceFile, 'rb'), delimiter=',', quotechar='"')) 
             if line[3] != '')

Of course this makes no sense if you need, e.g., random access to thefile. But if you're going to iterate over it line by line, this is probably the best solution. (Except that thefile shouldn't be a global; it should be passed around from function to function as needed.)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much! can you please tell me why you do not use thefile[i].pop()? –  Yuck Sep 25 '12 at 22:17
    
thefile[i].pop() just removes the last character from the line, it doesn't delete the entire line. (Try it and see.) –  abarnert Sep 25 '12 at 22:19
    
thefile.pop(i) should work fine. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 25 '12 at 22:21
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary: Yes, that's almost the same as del thefile[i], except that it returns the deleted value. At that point, it's really just a matter of style, but I think it's clearer to use del when the point is to delete something, pop when the point is to fetch-and-delete something. –  abarnert Sep 25 '12 at 22:22

Try using filter:

def CleanFile(sourceFile):
   global thefile
   thefile=list(csv.reader(open(sourceFile, 'rb'), delimiter=',', quotechar='"'))

   def f(x): return x[3] != ''
   thefile = filter(f, thefile)

   return thefile
share|improve this answer
1  
filter is one of those functions that Guido frowns on and would deprecate if anyone would let him, because it can be always be replaced by a comprehension (or generator expression), and because it explicitly turns any iterable into a list whether you want to or not (although itertools.ifilter solves that), so I try to avoid teaching it to new Python users. –  abarnert Sep 25 '12 at 22:23

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