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I have a C header file that contains 10x12 pixel bitmap font characters in an array of 2x12 (for a mono color lcd). This wastes the lower 6-bits of every other byte, not to mention being harder to render for having to skip the paddings.

What is the easiest way to convert this to simple serialized bits without the padded bits?

the solution that I see has a lot of complicated bit banging. Is there an easy way to do perform this?

0x00,0x00,  /*  ................  */
0x30,0x00,  /*  ..@@............  */
0x78,0x00,  /*  .@@@@...........  */
0x48,0x00,  /*  .@..@...........  */
0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
0xFC,0x00,  /*  @@@@@@..........  */
0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
0x00,0x00,  /*  ................  */
0x00,0x00   /*  ................  */
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No, there's no way to serialize bits without a lot of bit banging. And I'd think the extra padding would make the code simpler, not harder. –  Mark Ransom Sep 26 '12 at 0:03

5 Answers 5

Well, 10 × 12 = 120, and you can store 120 pixels in 15 bytes, exactly. Every 5 bytes encode 4 rows of pixels.

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Really? two ups for pointing out arithmetic and no real answer? –  MandoMando Sep 26 '12 at 0:17

As for the 'complicated bit-banging'... Yeah, it's complicated-ish, but if you write down your packed bytes and the index into the unpacked array where they come from, it's easy enough to work out how to construct each value...

|........|........|........|........|........|
|00000000|11222222|22334444|44445566|66666677|

The above cycle repeats 3 times.

char a[24] = {
    0x00,0x00,  /*  ................  */
    0x30,0x00,  /*  ..@@............  */
    0x78,0x00,  /*  .@@@@...........  */
    0x48,0x00,  /*  .@..@...........  */
    0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
    0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
    0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
    0xFC,0x00,  /*  @@@@@@..........  */
    0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
    0xCC,0x00,  /*  @@..@@..........  */
    0x00,0x00,  /*  ................  */
    0x00,0x00   /*  ................  */
};

void pack( char ap[15], const char a[24] )
{
    ap[0] = a[0];
    ap[1] = a[1] | (a[2] >> 2 );
    ap[2] = (a[2] << 6) | (a[3] >> 2 ) | (a[4] >> 4);
    ap[3] = (a[4] << 4) | (a[5] >> 4) | (a[6] >> 6);
    ap[4] = (a[6] << 2) | (a[7] >> 6);
    ap[5] = a[8];
    ap[6] = a[9] | (a[10] >> 2 );
    ap[7] = (a[10] << 6) | (a[11] >> 2 ) | (a[12] >> 4);
    ap[8] = (a[12] << 4) | (a[13] >> 4) | (a[14] >> 6);
    ap[9] = (a[14] << 2) | (a[15] >> 6);
    ap[10] = a[16];
    ap[11] = a[17] | (a[18] >> 2 );
    ap[12] = (a[18] << 6) | (a[19] >> 2 ) | (a[20] >> 4);
    ap[13] = (a[20] << 4) | (a[21] >> 4) | (a[22] >> 6);
    ap[14] = (a[22] << 2) | (a[23] >> 6);
}

You could do the above in a little loop if you like, to reduce the scope for making mistakes... Just loop from 0 to 2, and advance your arrays accordingly. You know, sort of like this (except you need proper pointers):

for( int i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) {
    ap[0] = a[0];
    ap[1] = a[1] | (a[2] >> 2 );
    ap[2] = (a[2] << 6) | (a[3] >> 2 ) | (a[4] >> 4);
    ap[3] = (a[4] << 4) | (a[5] >> 4) | (a[6] >> 6);
    ap[4] = (a[6] << 2) | (a[7] >> 6);
    ap += 5;
    a += 8;
}

I hope I got all those shifts right =)

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thanks for posting this. I was hoping for something a little more generic to work with other character sizes as well. It does give an idea, though. –  MandoMando Sep 26 '12 at 13:42
    
Oh, right... Well, look at the operations I've done and combine it with how I wrote out those indices. It's going to be fiddly, but the only real trick is the last byte (if the character width is not a multiple of 8 bits). That's when you 'drift' your bitshifts. –  paddy Sep 26 '12 at 21:39
    
Yeah, i ended up popping off single bit at time and adding to dst array. Idea of bit shifting multiple bits at variable locations in a generic solution was giving me a headache. The drift does come into play, the solution i posted has a small problem when WxH is non multiple of 8, but 8 divides the remainder. So the drift adds up and aligns to byte boundary. Anyway, thanks for the inspiration! –  MandoMando Sep 26 '12 at 22:54

What you've got is essentially an 8x15 sparse matrix.

There is a boost library - uBLAS - to help you deal with sparse matrices. It would help, for example, if your font dimensions change.

This question might also be of help.

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This is of course precisely the kind of problem that the JBIG CODEC is designed to handle - but there will be a monstrous amount of bit banging involved.

You'd probably also get decent results with dictionary encoding algorithms working on run-lengths of 0 as well.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

A simplified version can create a producer consumer going one bit at a time which keeps the bit banging to a sane level. Here's what I ended up doing:

#define CHAR_W 10
#define CHAR_H 12
#define NUM_CHARS 100
#define CEILING(x,y) (((x) + (y) - 1) / (y))
#define BYTES CEILING(CHAR_W, 8)
#define BIT(x, n) ( ((1 << n) & x) >> n )
#define COPYBIT(b,x,n) (((0x1 & b) << n) | x)
#define CHAR_BYTES CEILING(CHAR_H * CHAR_W, 8)
#define OUTBYTES NUM_CHARS * CHAR_BYTES

int main()
{
    int totinbit = 0;
    int locinbit = 0;
    int locoutbit = 7;  // start with msb 
    int totoutbit = 0;
    int bytes = BYTES;

    unsigned char c = 0;
    unsigned char o = 0;
    unsigned char buf[OUTBYTES];

    while (totoutbit < NUM_CHARS * CHAR_H * CHAR_W)
    {
        c = fontArray[totinbit / 8];
        locinbit = 7 - totinbit % 8;

        o = COPYBIT(BIT(c,locinbit),o,locoutbit);

        // reset out counter, full byte produced
        if (--locoutbit < 0)
        {
            locoutbit = 7;
            buf[totoutbit  / 8] = o;
            o = 0;
        }

        // skip over the padding bits
        if ((totoutbit % CHAR_W) == (CHAR_W - 1))
            totinbit =  CEILING(totinbit,8) * 8 - 1;

        totinbit++;     
        // character boundary
        if ( (totinbit % (bytes * 8 * CHAR_H)) == 0 && totinbit > 0)
        {
                            // pad the last byte in the character if necessary
            if (locoutbit != 7)
                    locoutbit = 7;
        }

        totoutbit++;


        }
 // at this point buf contains the converted bitmap array
}
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