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For a hash of this format:

my $itemHash = {
    tag1 => {
        name => "Item 1",
        order => 1,
        enabled => 1,
    },
    tag2 => {
        name => "Item 2",
        order => 2,
        enabled => 0,
    },
    tag3 => {
        name => "Item 3",
        order => 3,
        enabled => 1,
    },
    ...
}

I have this code that correctly iterates through the hash:

keys %$itemHash; # Resets the iterator
while(my($tag, $item) = each %$itemHash) {
    print "$tag is $item->{'name'}"
}

However, the order that these items are iterated in seems to be pretty random. Is it possible to use the same while format to iterate through them in the order specified by the 'order' key in the hash for each item?

(I know I can sort the keys first and then foreach loop through it. Just looking to see if there is cleaner way to do this.)

share|improve this question
    
The Tie::IxHash module might be worth a look, though you would have to either change your code to insert into the hash in the order matching the 'order' key, or call the Tie::IxHash Reorder method sometimes to put everything in the right order. –  rohanpm Sep 26 '12 at 0:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The concept of an "ordered hash" is wrong. While an array is an ordered list of elements, and therefore accessible by index, a hash is an (un-ordered) collection of key-value pairs, where the keys are a set.

To accomplish your task, you would have to sort the keys by the order property:

my @sorted = sort {$hash{$a}{order} <=> $hash{$b}{order}} keys %$itemHash;

You can then create the key-value pairs via map:

my @sortedpairs = map {$_ => $itemHash->{$_}} @sorted;

We could wrap this up into a sub:

sub ridiculousEach {
  my %hash = @_;
  return map
      {$_ => $hash{$_}}
        sort
          {$hash{$a}{order} <=> $hash{$b}{order}}
             keys %hash;
}

to get an even-sized list of key-value elements, and

sub giveIterator {
  my %hash = @_;
  my @sorted = sort {$hash{$a}{order} <=> $hash{$b}{order}} keys %hash;
  return sub {
     my $key = shift @sorted;
     return ($key => $hash{$key});
  };
}

to create a callback that is a drop-in for the each.

We can then do:

my $iterator = giveIterator(%$itemHash);
while (my ($tag, $item) = $iterator->()) {
  ...;
}

There is a severe drawback to this approach: each only uses two elements at a time, and thus operates in constant memory. This solution has to read in the whole hash and store an array of all keys. Unnoticable with small hashes, this can get important with a very large amount of elements.

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1  
Yeah, "sorted hash" is probably not a good way to describe it, but I was trying to be concise in the title. Thanks! –  Vidur Sep 26 '12 at 1:04

The order in which keys from the hash is undefined. So you'll need to sort the keys. One way would be, as you stated, to pull the keys out and sort them, then loop through the keys.

Another way would be to sort them on the fly. I'm not sure you'd consider it cleaner though. Something like:

for my $key ( sort { $itemHash->{$a}{order} <=> $itemhash->{$b}{order} } keys %$itemHash ) {
  print "$key is $itemHash->{$key}{name}";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep. I knew about this method. I was wondering if there was short(er) hand way of doing the same with a while loop –  Vidur Sep 26 '12 at 0:58

This will be quite cleaner. we have to use cmp for sorting strings.

my $itemHash = {
    tag1 => {
        name => "Item 1",
        order => 1,
        enabled => 1,
    },
    tag2 => {
        name => "Item 2",
        order => 2,
        enabled => 0,
    },
    tag3 => {
        name => "Item 3",
        order => 3,
        enabled => 1,
    }
};

foreach((sort{$a cmp $b}(keys(%$itemHash)))){
print "$_ is $itemHash->{$_}->{'name'}\n";
}
share|improve this answer

You can do some thing like :

foreach my $key (sort keys %{$itemHash}) {
    print "$key : " . $itemHash->{$key}{name} . "\n";
}
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