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If we want to show youtube videos using the player API on our site, we can do so no problem. In some cases it is only part of a clip we want to play. In the google terms of service for the youtube API they state that it is prohibited to:

"8. separate, isolate, or modify the audio or video components of any YouTube audiovisual content made available through the YouTube API"

Does this include showing partial youtube videos...? I would think not but I want clarification on this.

cheers

-------------------------------------- UPDATE --------------------------------------------

I have asked this question on the YouTube help forum

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1 Answer 1

I would say that what you're doing is definitely separating and isolating the video.
I would also try contacting youtube's support, though, to check.

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Thanks for your response... My only doubt is that I think they are meaning you cannot separate or isolate the audio from the video and present these as separate elements (a soundtrack as one element and a video as another) nor can you modify the soundtrack for a video and present these together which would effectively result in a new (different) video clip. We want to separate and isolate the part from the whole, the part will not be modified and will be exactly as it appears in the original video. –  undefined Aug 11 '09 at 10:29
    
Since you are showing only part of the clip it counts as "modifying" the video component, which is explicitly forbidden. So it's definitely against the terms of use there. Still, it couldn't hurt to get in contact with their support (not community support - actual employees) and try to get permission. They might just not care and let you if you ask. –  PhantomCode Aug 12 '09 at 6:29

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