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I have a method like this:

private async Task DoSomething()
{
    // long running work here.
}

When I call the method like this it blocks the UI:

Task t = DoSomething();

I have to do one of these to make it non-blocking:

Task t = new Task(() => DoSomething());
t.Start();

// Or

Task t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomething());

So what is the point of async / await when you can just use Tasks as they were in framework 4 and use Task.Wait() in place of await?

EDIT: I understand all of your answers - but none really address my last paragraph. Can anyone give me an example of Task based multi-threading where async / await improves the readability and/or flow of the program?

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2  
The purpose of async is not multithreading. It's for asynchronous programming. You can do multithreading using Task.Run, but async can also work with other asynchronous operations such as I/O. The Task-based Asynchronous Pattern is powerful because it can treat any asynchronous operation (whether CPU-bound, I/O-bound, or other) in the same way. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 26 '12 at 13:26
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

async methods begin their execution synchronously. async is useful for composing asynchronous operations, but it does not magically make code run on another thread unless you tell it to.

You can use Task.Run to schedule CPU-bound work to a threadpool thread.

See my async / await intro post or the async FAQ for more information.

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How are you using await? This doesn't block the UI:

    private async Task DoSomething()
    {
        await Task.Delay(5000);
    }

    private async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        await DoSomething();
        MessageBox.Show("Finished");
    }

Note that I didn't have to write any verbose callback stuff. That's the point of async/await.

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This doesn't block the UI because Task.Delay uses a System.Threading.Timer, which runs on the ThreadPool. Try using Thread.Sleep(5000) and you'll see that the UI blocks. –  Bruno Santos Oct 17 '12 at 19:30
    
BTW, this idea that by using async you don't need to create threads seem to me to be complete BS. The fact that await can only be applied to methods that return Task or Task<T> obviously indicates that at some point someone will have to create a new Task! –  Bruno Santos Oct 17 '12 at 20:00
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Without the actual code, it's hard to tell you what's going on, but you can start your DoSomething with 'await Task.Yield();' to force it to return immediately, in case what's running before the first await is what's causing your UI issue.

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