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I'm trying to achieve something like this

public abstract class BaseEvent
{
    public abstract void Dispatch(IEventHandler handler);
}

public class MyEvent : BaseEvent
{
    public override void Dispatch(IMyEventHandler handler)
    {
        handler.OnMyEvent(this);
    }
}

public interface IEventHandler
{
}

public interface IMyEventHandler : IEventHandler
{
    void OnMyEvent(MyEvent e);
}

The problem is that the compiler complains saying that MyEvent doesn't implement BaseEvent since Dispatch is taking an IMyEventHandler instead of an IEventHandler. I don't want to let MyEvent.Dispatch take a IEventHandler then cast it to a IMyEventHandler because I would like compile time checks to make sure I'm not doing something stupid like passing in some other type of event handler. I found a possible solution (below) but I'm wondering if there is a nicer way of doing this.

public abstract class BaseEvent<H> where H : IEventHandler
{
    public abstract void Dispatch(H handler);
}

public class MyFirstEvent<H> : BaseEvent<H> where H : IMyFirstEventHandler
{
    public override void Dispatch(H handler)
    {
        handler.OnMyFirstEvent(this);
    }
}

public interface IEventHandler
{
}

public interface IMyFirstEventHandler : IEventHandler
{
    void OnMyFirstEvent<H>(MyFirstEvent<H> e) where H : IMyFirstEventHandler;
}

Thanks, Tom

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've used your approach before.

It looks pretty solid to me.

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Do you know if there is a name for this pattern? –  Tom Sep 26 '12 at 1:03
    
@Tom: I haven't heard of a name for this pattern, but when I first used it, I thought it was a classic use-case for .NET generics. Emphasis: It was the correct usage of .NET generics. [I've seen many incorrect usages of .NET generics.] –  Jim G. Sep 26 '12 at 15:13

MyEvent change the abstract method Dispatch's signature. so you got a compile time error.

how about follow code.

public class MyEvent : BaseEvent
{
    public override void Dispatch(IEventHandler handler)
    {
        if(!handler is IMyFirstEventHandler )throw new ArgumentException("message").
        ((IMyFirstEventHandler )handler).OnMyEvent(this);
    }
}
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This does not give a compilation error. Doing the wrong thing here would only result in a runtime exception. –  Tom Sep 26 '12 at 1:02

This seems pretty similar to Help With Overriding and Inheritance. I'm pretty confident you need to the keyword 'virtual' if you want to override a method.

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1  
Methods need to be virtual OR abstract; This link sums up the difference pretty nicely. Anyway, that's not the problem; the problem is that the method that my derived class is supposed to be overriding needs to take as a parameter a subclass of the parameter that the base method takes. –  Tom Sep 26 '12 at 2:57
    
Cool, thanks for that. I am learning as well. –  Andrew Sep 28 '12 at 2:07

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