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I'm creating a machine that generates a shotgun with random components that effect the overall quality of the gun. I'm having a problem generating the random parts that will comprise the shotgun. There are 4 parts that have to be generated. When I created each of these functions, I tested them individually and they all work but when I try to put them together with the createChromo() function, the numbers are individually random. I should be getting results like 2131 and 1332, but I keep getting 1111 or 1112 or 2221 or 2222....Here is the code:

int generateButt()
{
    srand(unsigned(time(NULL)));
    int buttType = rand() % 3 + 1;

    if(buttType == 1)
    {
         accuracy = rand() % ((5 - 2) + 2) / 10.0;

         fireRate = fireRate - 0.3;
    }
    if(buttType == 2)
    {
        accuracy = rand() % ((8 + 5) + 5)/ 10.0;

        fireRate = fireRate - 0.2;
    }
    if(buttType == 3)
    {
        accuracy = rand() % ((11 + 8) + 8) / 10.0;

        fireRate = fireRate - 0.1;
    }

    return buttType;
}
int generateBarrel()
{
    srand(unsigned(time(NULL)));
    int barrelType = rand() % 3 + 1;

    if(barrelType == 1)
    {
        range = rand() % (16 - 5) + 5;

        power = power + 3;
    }
    if(barrelType == 2)
    {
        range = rand() % (21 - 16) + 16;

        power = power + 1;
    }
    if(barrelType == 3)
    {
        range = rand() % (26 + 21) + 21;

        power = power - 1;
    }

    return barrelType;
}
int generateBullet()
{
    srand(unsigned(time(NULL)));
    int bulletType = rand() % 3 + 1;

    if(bulletType == 1)
    {
        power = rand() % (16 - 10) + 10;

        range = range + 5;
    }
    if(bulletType == 2)
    {
        power = rand() % (26 - 16) + 16;

        range = range + 1;
    }
    if(bulletType == 3)
    {
        power = rand() % (35 - 26) + 26;

        range = range - 2;
    }

    return bulletType;
}
int generateAction()
{
    srand(unsigned(time(NULL)));
    int actionType = rand() % 2 + 1;

    if(actionType == 1)
    {
        fireRate = 1.5;

        accuracy = accuracy + 0.2;
    }
    if(actionType == 2)
    {
        fireRate = 2.0;

        accuracy = accuracy - 0.1;
    }

    return actionType;
}

void createChromo(int a, int b, int c, int d)
{
    cout <<a<<b<<c<<d<<"\n";
}

int main()
{
        for(int i = 0; i < popSize; i++)
        createChromo(generateButt(), generateBarrel(), generateBullet(), generateAction());
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by bames53, jogojapan, SingerOfTheFall, Bo Persson, Mario Mar 2 at 21:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
You should be calling srand once. –  chris Sep 26 '12 at 2:40
    
@chris - you should make that the answer that the random sequence is not seeded - funny enough this was an inspection issue on a colleges code today :-) –  Adrian Cornish Sep 26 '12 at 2:41
1  
@AdrianCornish, Seemed a bit weeny, but yeah, I guess. –  chris Sep 26 '12 at 2:42
    
Also the code here tries to produce several different distributions manually and would really benefit from the C++ <random> library built-in distributions. –  bames53 Sep 26 '12 at 2:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're calling srand each time you call either function. What srand does is seed the generator for a new string of random numbers. You base that seed off of the current second, so if it's called in the same second, the seed will be the same as last time, and thus the sequence of random numbers obtained from rand() will be as well.

Call srand(time(NULL)); once at the beginning of your program to just have one sequence, and keep using the next number in that one sequence instead of starting the same sequence over.

If you have access to C++11, you might consider using the <random> header as well.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, removing the excess calls to srand(time(NULL)) helped –  Scott Sep 26 '12 at 2:57
    
@Scott, And cut down the size :) I'd really recommend looking into the header sometime if you can, though, as the features offered in it are much vaster and better than the stuff we got from C. –  chris Sep 26 '12 at 2:59
  1. the concept of random does not exist in the entire computation world
  2. the function srand() is used to set a seed for the rand() function
  3. if you set 2 different seed your generator of pseudo-random numbers will behave in 2 different ways
share|improve this answer
    
1) yes it does. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 26 '12 at 2:45
    
@SethCarnegie how ? where ? when ? –  axis Sep 26 '12 at 2:46
    
You can get use physical devices to get data which is truly random. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 26 '12 at 2:48
    
@SethCarnegie this is a big error, analogic data also generates infinite variations and is impossible to read from physical device in a way that you can preserve all the data because the computation world is finite and the physical world it's not. Also i was writing about the computation world, not the physical world. –  axis Sep 26 '12 at 2:51
    
Yes, the physical devices can give truly random input to a computation process, but cannot really be a part of it... –  masaers Sep 26 '12 at 2:54

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