Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to know how to determine the SQL Server replication type by TSQL. For example, transactional replication, transactional replication with queued update, merge replication etc. Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Run the following query on the distribution database:

SELECT 
     P.Publication
    ,P.Publication_type
    ,S.Subscriber_ID
    ,S.Update_Mode
FROM MSPublications P
INNER JOIN MSSubscriptions S
    ON P.Publication_ID = S.Publication_ID

Publication_type - 0=Transactional, 1=Snapshot, 2=Merge

Update_mode - 0=Read only, 1=Immediate update, 2=queued update with message queue, 3=Immediate update with queued update as failover using message queue, 4=Queued update with SQL Server queue, 5=Immediate update with queued update as failover using SQL Server queue

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Carter, Thanks for your reply. How do you know the meaning of the column update_mode? It was not described in any version of the SQL Server documentation, even in the most recent SQL 2012. – Ogrish Man Oct 9 '12 at 7:33
    
It is documented on MSDN, but hard to find. If I can find the link again I will post it – Pete Carter Oct 9 '12 at 7:42

Here is a link to the Microsoft BOL page with the update_mode decoded: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186785.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
You should explain more, not just post a link. And provide some example. – partlov Feb 12 '13 at 15:31
    
Links with little information should be posted in the comment section. – doge Feb 12 '13 at 15:40
    
Anyway, this link is useful. Thanks all! – Ogrish Man Feb 13 '13 at 12:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.