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For example, this code compiles and outputs false, because Scala compiler implicitly converts Ints to Doubles instead of creating List[AnyVal], and this looks strange to me, because this can lead to data loss (floating-point types are not precise, for example; and it can do similar thing with other types that may have dangerous implicit conversions). Why designers of Scala have chosen to do it this way? (I'm using version 2.9)

object Main {
    def main(args: Array[String]) {
        val x = List(3, 2)
        val y = List(3, 2.0)
        println(x.head / 2 == y.head / 2)
    }
}
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If you don't want conversion to floating point types, then why are you creating lists that have floating point numbers? If you don't want that, just don't stick any floating point numbers in or convert those floating point numbers to non-floating-point numbers. –  Wilfred Springer Sep 26 '12 at 8:27
    
Because I want to create such lists, for example. –  Sarge Borsch Sep 26 '12 at 8:29
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have only two possibilities here: promote to Double or widen to AnyVal. In the latter case, division isn't even defined, which is kind of useless. If you want to demand this behavior, you can explicitly specify the type:

val y = List[AnyVal](3,2.0)
y.head match {
  case i: Int => println("Whew, it is still an int!")  // This is printed
  case _ => println("Bah, it messed up again")
}
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Yes, I know that. But for other mixed lists compiler automatically chooses AnyVal, or lowest common hierarchical parent. (example: val x = List(List(1), Vector(1)) //x: List[Seq[Int]] because List[T] is Seq[T] and Vector[T] is Seq[T] for all T) Behaviour with numeric types seems like exception from rule to me, since Double is not a supertype of Int, because(obviously) Int cannot hold most of valid Double values. Conversion, instead, in some cases like this can lead to data loss and i'm surprised that compiler don't even give a warning. –  Sarge Borsch Sep 26 '12 at 7:46
2  
@SargeBorsch - Given that Java promotes ints to doubles, and given that Scala has borrowed the same policy (presumably to aid adoption and obey the principle of least surprise for Java-users), it makes sense that you ask "hey, can I promote to double?" before asking "hey, can I widen to AnyVal". Otherwise you end up with weird surprises when you would have anticipated promotion (e.g. math.max(3,2.0) and List(3,2.0).max). –  Rex Kerr Sep 26 '12 at 8:15
    
May be. It's sad, though. I chose Scala primarily because it's different from Java, to be able to write programs for Android without using Java with its design failures. Seems like it's the only 99% compatible working alternative at the moment. –  Sarge Borsch Sep 26 '12 at 8:21
    
@SargeBorsch - It would be nice to have an option to turn it off. For 90% of uses, though, I'll take the convenience of not needing to throw an extra .0 or d on there where "obviously" supposed to be a double over the occasional possibility for of a type error. No point being gratuitously different from Java; the policy is not without reason. (Anyway, I'd turn off +-means-string-concat way before I'd turn off 3+3.0-means-promote-to-double.) –  Rex Kerr Sep 26 '12 at 8:34
    
Type-checking error at compile time is better than runtime error or even wrong result, isn't it? –  Sarge Borsch Sep 26 '12 at 13:42
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Lists are homogeneously typed. When you put items of different types into a List, the compiler has to figure out what type to give to the whole list. When you put a Double and an Int into a List, Scala decides that the type of the List should be List[Double] since that is something that both item can be converted to. See in the REPL:

scala> val y = List(3, 2.0)
y: List[Double] = List(3.0, 2.0)

The fix is to manually convert your list to be a List[Int]:

scala> val y = List(3, 2.0).map(_.toInt)
y: List[Int] = List(3, 2)

That way, your test comes out true:

scala> println(x.head / 2 == y.head / 2)
true
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This has nothing to do with the general problem, that List must have been created heterogenous (for example, List[AnyVal]). I have been always scared by languages that implicitly did type conversions that can lead to data loss. (Int to Long is OK, but Int to Float/Double?) And my example then shouldn't even compile, and this is good. (Unless we want polymorphic numeric tower, but this is another big topic) –  Sarge Borsch Sep 26 '12 at 7:52
2  
To be fair, your question is kind of vague about what the "general problem" is. I read it as "I don't understand why this is happening". But what you really meant to ask is "Why have the designers of Scala chosen to do it this way?" –  dhg Sep 26 '12 at 7:57
    
Yes, i'll correct this now. –  Sarge Borsch Sep 26 '12 at 7:58
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If you don't want conversion to floating point types, then why are you creating lists that have floating point numbers? If you don't want that, just don't stick any floating point numbers in or convert those floating point numbers to non-floating-point numbers.

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2  
while a very good question, this isn't an answer to the actual question –  Jed Wesley-Smith Sep 26 '12 at 8:00
1  
... meanwhile, the question changed. So I think this was an answer to the original question. Added it as a comment now though. –  Wilfred Springer Sep 26 '12 at 8:29
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