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I have two classes:

public class firstClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public List<secondClass> Elements { get; set; }
}

public class secondClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public bool Is{ get; set; }
}

and using of their:

List<firstClass> list = allFirstClassFromDB.Include("Elements");

and then my list contain for example:

list[0] - {Id : 1, Elements : [0] { Id: 1, Is: true }, [1] { Id: 2, Is: true }, [2] { Id: 3, Is: false }
list[1] - {Id : 2, Elements : [0] { Id:4, Is: false }, [1] { Id: 5, Is: true }, [2] { Id: 6, Is: false }
list[2] - {Id : 3, Elements : [0] { Id:7, Is: false } }

So The result which I need is only this location which contain Elements which have Is prop set for true, sth like this:

list[0] - {Id : 1, Elements : [0] { Id: 1, Is: true }, [1] { Id: 2, Is: true } }
list[1] - {Id : 2, Elements : [0] { Id: 5, Is: true } }

It is possible in linq? Any help would be appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is how you can do it using LINQ:

var filteredList = list
  .Select(
    x => new firstClass {
      Id = x.Id,
      Elements = x.Elements.Where(y => y.Is).ToList()
    }
  )
  .Where(x => x.Elements.Count > 0);
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Thanks, this is what I am looking for. –  Mateusz Rogulski Sep 26 '12 at 7:31

First, get rid of firstClass which does not have any secondClass.Is true by Where clause, then re-build firstClass just to filter all secondClass.Is true

list.Where(f => f.Elements.Any(s => s.Is))
    .Select(f => new firstClass() {
                                      Id = f.Id,
                                      Elements = f.Elements.Where(s => s.Is)
                                                           .ToList()
    }).ToList();
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