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Is there a way to easier start stepping through code except to start the service through the Windows Service Controll Management and then attach the debugger to the thread? It's kind of cumbersome and I'm wondering if there is not a more straight-forward approach.

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22 Answers 22

up vote 165 down vote accepted

If I want to quickly debug the service, I just drop in a Debugger.Break() in there. When that line is reached, it will drop me back to VS. Don't forget to remove that line when you are done.

UPDATE: As an alternative to #if DEBUG pragmas, you can also use Conditional("DEBUG_SERVICE") attribute.

[Conditional("DEBUG_SERVICE")]
private static void DebugMode()
{
    Debugger.Break();
}

On your OnStart, just call this method:

public override void OnStart()
{
     DebugMode();
     /* ... do the rest */
}

There, the code will only be enabled during Debug builds. While your at it, it might be useful to create a separate Build Configuration for service debugging.

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24  
Or you could use Debugger.Launch() you will have to include a using statement for The Systems.Diagnostics namespace. –  Omar Kooheji Sep 24 '08 at 8:39
5  
Excellent. 2 years later, this is still quite relevant and useful :) –  ashes999 Oct 20 '10 at 18:50
8  
4 years later, this is still relevant and useful :) –  AFD Mar 8 '12 at 15:53
3  
Link is no longer working and is now NSFW! –  Moulde Jan 7 '13 at 8:58
3  
5 years later and . . . oh forget it. (Thanks btw) –  Casey Margell Jun 10 '13 at 22:00

I also think having a separate "version" for normal execution and as a service is the way to go, but is it really required to dedicate a separate command line switch for that purpose?

Couldn't you just do:

public static int Main(string[] args)
{
  if (!Environment.UserInteractive)
  {
    // Startup as service.
  }
  else
  {
    // Startup as application
  }
}

That would have the "benefit", that you can just start your app via doubleclick (OK, if you really need that) and that you can just hit F5 in Visual Studio (without the need to modify the project settings to include that /console Option).

Technically, the Environment.UserInteractive checks if the WSF_VISIBLE Flag is set for the current window station, but is there any other reason where it would return false, apart from being run as a (non-interactive) service?

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1  
Environment.UserInteractive works perfectly for me! –  Martin Feb 13 '09 at 8:24
1  
Brilliant! This is probably the best answer of the lot! –  Trumpi Nov 25 '09 at 10:34
21  
If you don't want the program to run when it's double-clicked (users might get confused and run several instances etc), then you can use System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached instead of Environment.UserInteractive. –  Blorgbeard May 17 '10 at 15:22
3  
but is there any other reason where it would return false, apart from being run as a (non-interactive) service? I can think of one: A scheduled task which does not attach to a console. –  Hogan Sep 26 '11 at 20:13
4  
i use command line parameters for this case. --install to install the service, --uninstall to uninstall the service and --interactive to run the service as application. i add --interactive to project options (Debugging > Command Arguments). So i can easily debug from VS. double clicking will not create an unwanted running instance since --interactive is required. just my 2 cents. –  Emir Akaydın Feb 14 '12 at 16:42

When I set up a new service project a few weeks ago I found this post. While there are many great suggestions, I still didn't find the solution I wanted: The possibility to call the service classes' OnStart and OnStop methods without any modification to the service classes.

The solution I came up with uses the Environment.Interactive the select running mode, as suggested by other answers to this post.

static void Main()
{
    ServiceBase[] servicesToRun;
    servicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] 
    {
        new MyService()
    };
    if (Environment.UserInteractive)
    {
        RunInteractive(servicesToRun);
    }
    else
    {
        ServiceBase.Run(servicesToRun);
    }
}

The RunInteractive helper uses reflection to call the protected OnStart and OnStop methods:

static void RunInteractive(ServiceBase[] servicesToRun)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Services running in interactive mode.");
    Console.WriteLine();

    MethodInfo onStartMethod = typeof(ServiceBase).GetMethod("OnStart", 
        BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
    foreach (ServiceBase service in servicesToRun)
    {
        Console.Write("Starting {0}...", service.ServiceName);
        onStartMethod.Invoke(service, new object[] { new string[] { } });
        Console.Write("Started");
    }

    Console.WriteLine();
    Console.WriteLine();
    Console.WriteLine(
        "Press any key to stop the services and end the process...");
    Console.ReadKey();
    Console.WriteLine();

    MethodInfo onStopMethod = typeof(ServiceBase).GetMethod("OnStop", 
        BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
    foreach (ServiceBase service in servicesToRun)
    {
        Console.Write("Stopping {0}...", service.ServiceName);
        onStopMethod.Invoke(service, null);
        Console.WriteLine("Stopped");
    }

    Console.WriteLine("All services stopped.");
    // Keep the console alive for a second to allow the user to see the message.
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
}

This is all the code required, but I also wrote walkthrough with explanations.

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1  
Cool, works for me, debugging a service in code. –  Marcel Oct 8 '12 at 10:36
2  
+1000 Wow is nice, thank you very very much. –  IamStalker Dec 31 '12 at 5:25
    
This makes a good extension method for ServiceBase[]. I have multiple services in my solution so rather than having a common base class for Program.cs, I just call servicesToRun.RunInteractive(args). Nice solution @Anders! –  David Keaveny Apr 3 '13 at 23:13
1  
Great solution indeed. I created a simple extension for ServiceBase[] as David suggested which allows to run services in just one line of code: pastebin.com/F0fhhG2R –  Funbit Apr 26 '13 at 3:41
    
@Funbit That's really neat - would you mind if I published it on my blog as an update to the walkthrough? –  Anders Abel Apr 26 '13 at 8:14

What I usually do is encapsulate the logic of the service in a separate class and start that from a 'runner' class. This runner class can be the actual service or just a console application. So your solution has (atleast) 3 projects:

/ConsoleRunner
   /....
/ServiceRunner
   /....
/ApplicationLogic
   /....
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1  
I used to use this approach too, but I think a combination of this and the answer above works a treat. –  RobS Feb 24 '09 at 4:55

UPDATE

This approach is by far the easiest:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/DebugWinServices.aspx

I leave my original answer below for posterity.


My services tend to have a class that encapsulates a Timer as I want the service to check at regular intervals whether there is any work for it to do.

We new up the class and call StartEventLoop() during the service start-up. (This class could easily be used from a console app too.)

The nice side-effect of this design is that the arguments with which you set up the Timer can be used to have a delay before the service actually starts working, so that you have time to attach a debugger manually.

p.s. How to attach the debugger manually to a running process...?

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Configuration;    

public class ServiceEventHandler
{
    Timer _timer;
    public ServiceEventHandler()
    {
        // get configuration etc.
        _timer = new Timer(
            new TimerCallback(EventTimerCallback)
            , null
            , Timeout.Infinite
            , Timeout.Infinite);
    }

    private void EventTimerCallback(object state)
    {
        // do something
    }

    public void StartEventLoop()
    {
        // wait a minute, then run every 30 minutes
        _timer.Change(TimeSpan.Parse("00:01:00"), TimeSpan.Parse("00:30:00");
    }
}

Also I used to do the following (already mentioned in previous answers but with the conditional compiler [#if] flags to help avoid it firing in a Release build).

I stopped doing it this way because sometimes we'd forget to build in Release and have a debugger break in an app running on a client demo (embarrasing!).

#if DEBUG
if (!System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached)
{
    System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Break();
}
#endif
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2  
I need that! Upvoted! –  John Dunagan Jan 9 '09 at 19:22

Sometimes it is important to analyze what's going on during the start up of the service. Attaching to the process does not help here, because you are not quick enough to attach the debugger while the service is starting up.

The short answer is, I am using the following 4 lines of code to do this:

#if DEBUG
    base.RequestAdditionalTime(600000); // 600*1000ms = 10 minutes timeout
    Debugger.Launch(); // launch and attach debugger
#endif

These are inserted into the OnStart method of the service as follows:

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
    #if DEBUG
       base.RequestAdditionalTime(600000); // 10 minutes timeout for startup
       Debugger.Launch(); // launch and attach debugger
    #endif
    MyInitOnstart(); // my individual initialization code for the service
    // allow the base class to perform any work it needs to do
    base.OnStart(args);
}

For those who haven't done it before, I have included detailed hints below, because you can easily get stuck. The following hints refer to Windows 7x64 and Visual Studio 2010 Team Edition, but should be valid for other environments, too.


Important: Deploy the service in "manual" mode (using either the InstallUtil utility from the VS command prompt or run a service installer project you have prepared). Open Visual Studio before you start the service and load the solution containing the service's source code - set up additional breakpoints as you require them in Visual Studio - then start the service via the Service Control Panel.

Because of the Debugger.Launch code, this will cause a dialog "An unhandled Microsoft .NET Framework exception occured in Servicename.exe." to appear. Click "Yes, debug Servicename.exe": FrameworkException

Afterwards, escpecially in Windows 7 UAC might prompt you to enter admin credentials. Enter them and proceed with "Yes":

UACPrompt

After that, the well known Visual Studio Just-In-Time Debugger window appears. It asks you if you want to debug using the delected debugger. Before you select "Yes", select that you don't want to open a new instance (2nd option) - a new instance would not be helpful here, because the source code wouldn't be displayed. So you select the Visual Studio instance you've opened earlier instead: VSDebuggerPrompt

After you have clicked "Yes", after a while Visual Studio will show the yellow arrow right in the line where the Debugger.Launch statement is and you are able to debug your code (method MyInitOnStart, which contains your initialization). VSDebuggerBreakpoint

Pressing F5 continues execution immediately, until the next breakpoint you have prepared is reached.

Hint: To keep the service running, select Debug -> Detach all. This allows you to run a client communicating with the service after it started up correctly and you're finished debugging the startup code. If you press Shift+F5 (stop debugging), this will terminate the service. Instead of doing this, you should use the Service Control Panel to stop it.

Note that

  • If you build a Release, then the debug code is automatically removed and the service runs normally.

  • I am using Debugger.Launch(), which starts and attaches a debugger. I have tested Debugger.Break() as well, which did not work, because there is no debugger attached on start up of the service yet (causing the "Error 1067: The process terminated unexpectedly.").

  • RequestAdditionalTime sets a longer timeout for the startup of the service (it is not delaying the code itself, but will immediately continue with the Debugger.Launch statement). Otherwise the default timeout for starting the service is too short and starting the service fails if you don't call base.Onstart(args) quickly enough from the debugger. Practically, a timeout of 10 minutes avoids that you see the message "the service did not respond..." immediately after the debugger is started.

  • Once you get used to it, this method is very easy because it just requires you to add 4 lines to an existing service code, allowing you quickly to gain control and debug.

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2  
This needs more votes! –  Chibueze Opata Sep 4 '13 at 17:21
    
Out of curiousity, do you know if there is a timeout for user interaction with the Debugger.Launch() user prompt? –  Shiv Nov 25 at 4:54
    
As described, base.RequestAdditionalTime(600000) will prevent the service control from terminating the service for 10 minutes if it does not call base.OnStart(args) within that timespan). Apart from that, I remember that UAC will also abort if you don't enter the admin credentials after a while (I don't know how many seconds exactly, but I think you have to enter it within a minute, else UAC aborts), which will terminate the debug session. –  Matt Nov 25 at 9:02

What I used to do was to have a command line switch which would start the program either as a service or as a regular application. Then, in my IDE I would set the switch so that I could step through my code.

With some languages you can actually detect if it's running in an IDE, and perform this switch automatically.

What language are you using?

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static void Main()
{
#if DEBUG
                // Run as interactive exe in debug mode to allow easy
                // debugging.

                var service = new MyService();
                service.OnStart(null);

                // Sleep the main thread indefinitely while the service code
                // runs in .OnStart

                Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite);
#else
                // Run normally as service in release mode.

                ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun;
                ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[]{ new MyService() };
                ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
#endif
}
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[Sorry about no explanation with the code - markdown problems] Should run normally from MS Visual Studio (F5) in debug builds. Still runs as a normal service in release builds. –  Thomas Bratt Sep 29 '08 at 21:48
    
Combine this with the solution above by Christian K. to use the "Environment.UserInteractive" property and the solution is really clean and simple. –  Ben Robbins Mar 25 '10 at 10:03
    
OnStart is protected and you can't modify the access level :( –  Eduard Luca Aug 24 '13 at 20:20

You can also start the service through the command prompt (sc.exe).

Personally, I'd run the code as a stand-alone program in the debugging phase, and when most bugs are ironed out, change to running as service.

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I think it depends on what OS you are using, Vista is much harder to attach to Services, because of the separation between sessions.

The two options I've used in the past are:

  • Use GFlags (in the Debugging Tools for Windows) to setup a permanent debugger for a process. This exists in the "Image File Execution Options" registry key and is incredibly useful. I think you'll need to tweak the Service settings to enable "Interact with Desktop". I use this for all types of debugging, not just services.
  • The other option, is to separate the code a bit, so that the service part is interchangable with a normal app startup. That way, you can use a simple command line flag, and launch as a process (rather than a Service), which makes it much easier to debug.

Hope this helps.

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+1 for GFlags. This is especially useful if you cannot modify the source code (or if you don't have it). –  Chris Gillum Dec 29 '09 at 3:09

When I write a service I put all the service logic in a dll project and create two "hosts" that call into this dll, one is a Windows service and the other is a command line application.

I use the command line application for debugging and attach the debugger to the real service only for bugs I can't reproduce in the command line application.

I you use this approach just remember that you have to test all the code while running in a real service, while the command line tool is a nice debugging aid it's a different environment and it doesn't behave exactly like a real service.

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When developing and debugging a Windows service I typically run it as a console application by adding a /console startup parameter and checking this. Makes life much easier.

static void Main(string[] args) {
    if (Console.In != StreamReader.Null) {
        if (args.Length > 0 && args[0] == "/console") {
            // Start your service work.
        }
    }
}
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Till you have to debug service specific issues. –  leppie Sep 24 '08 at 8:19
    
True, then you have to attach the debugger to the actual service process. But in most cases bugs are going to appear either way and development is much easier. –  Maurice Sep 24 '08 at 8:24

How about Debugger.Break() in the first line?

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I'm pretty sure this doesn't work on Vista. –  RichS Sep 24 '08 at 8:33
    
I cant say I have tried it in a service on Vista :) –  leppie Sep 24 '08 at 9:19

I like to be able to debug every aspect of my service, including any initialization in OnStart(), while still executing it with full service behavior within the framework of the SCM... no "console" or "app" mode.

I do this by creating a second service, in the same project, to use for debugging. The debug service, when started as usual (i.e. in the services MMC plugin), creates the service host process. This gives you a process to attach the debugger to even though you haven't started your real service yet. After attaching the debugger to the process, start your real service and you can break into it anywhere in the service lifecycle, including OnStart().

Because it requires very minimal code intrusion, the debug service can easily be included in your service setup project, and is easily removed from your production release by commenting out a single line of code and deleting a single project installer.

Details:

1) Assuming you are implementing MyService, also create MyServiceDebug. Add both to the ServiceBase array in Program.cs like so:

    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    static void Main()
    {
        ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun;
        ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] 
        { 
            new MyService(),
            new MyServiceDebug()
        };
        ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
    }

2) Add the real service AND the debug service to the project installer for the service project:

enter image description here

Both services (real and debug) get included when you add the service project output to the setup project for the service. After installation, both services will appear in the service.msc MMC plugin.

3) Start the debug service in MMC.

4) In Visual Studio, attach the debugger to the process started by the debug service.

5) Start the real service and enjoy debugging.

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This YouTube video by Fabio Scopel explains how to debug a Windows service quite nicely... the actual method of doing it starts at 4:45 in the video...

Here is the code explained in the video... in your Program.cs file, add the stuff for the Debug section...

namespace YourNamespace
{
    static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        static void Main()
        {
#if DEBUG
            Service1 myService = new Service1();
            myService.OnDebug();
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);
#else
            ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun;
            ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[]
            {
                new Service1()
            };
            ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
#endif

        }
    }
}

In your Service1.cs file, add the OnDebug() method...

    public Service1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public void OnDebug()
    {
        OnStart(null);
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        // your code to do something
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
    }
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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  chrylis Sep 10 '13 at 21:55
    
Understood... answer modified to include code... –  Jason Miller Sep 11 '13 at 2:16

For routine small-stuff programming I've done a very simple trick to easily debug my service:

On start of the service, I check for a command line parameter "/debug". If the service is called with this parameter, I don't do the usual service startup, but instead start all the listeners and just display a messagebox "Debug in progress, press ok to end".

So if my service is started the usual way, it will start as service, if it is started with the command line parameter /debug it will act like a normal program.

In VS I'll just add /debug as debugging parameter and start the service program directly.

This way I can easily debug for most small kind problems. Of course, some stuff still will need to be debugged as service, but for 99% this is good enough.

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To debug Windows Services I combine GFlags and a .reg file created by regedit.

  1. Run GFlags, specifying the exe-name and vsjitdebugger
  2. Run regedit and go to the location where GFlags sets his options
  3. Choose "Export Key" from the file-menu
  4. Save that file somewhere with the .reg extension
  5. Anytime you want to debug the service: doubleclick on the .reg file
  6. If you want to stop debugging, doubleclick on the second .reg file

Or save the following snippets and replace servicename.exe with the desired executable name.


debugon.reg:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\servicename.exe]
"GlobalFlag"="0x00000000"
"Debugger"="vsjitdebugger.exe"


debugoff.reg:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\servicename.exe]
"GlobalFlag"="0x00000000"
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Does this still work on Win 7 / Win 2008? It's the approach from support.microsoft.com/kb/824344 but it relies on interactive services, and I thought they got killed off? It always used to be my preferred option (since startup issues might come up in production, where inserting a Debugger.Break() into the code might not be an option). –  piers7 Apr 9 '10 at 13:20
#if DEBUG
    System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Break();
#endif
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I use a variation on JOP's answer. Using command line parameters you can set the debugging mode in the IDE with project properties or through the Windows service manager.

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
  if (args.Contains<string>("DEBUG_SERVICE"))
  {
    Debugger.Break();
  }
  ...
}
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Use the TopShelf library.

Create a console application then configure setup in your Main

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            HostFactory.Run(x =>
            {

                // setup service start and stop.
                x.Service<Controller>(s =>
                {
                    s.ConstructUsing(name => new Controller());
                    s.WhenStarted(controller => controller.Start());
                    s.WhenStopped(controller => controller.Stop());
                });

                // setup recovery here
                x.EnableServiceRecovery(rc =>
                {
                    rc.RestartService(delayInMinutes: 0);
                    rc.SetResetPeriod(days: 0);
                });

                x.RunAsLocalSystem();
            });
        }
}

public class Controller
    {
        public void Start()
        {

        }

        public void Stop()
        {

        }
    }

To debug your service, just hit F5 in visual studio.

To install service, type in cmd "console.exe install"

You can then start and stop service in the windows service manager.

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What you need is thinking of Simplifying Windows Services

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This is quite a bit after the question, but might be useful for future reference.

If you can, I'd suggest using the excellent TopShelf project. It makes development and debugging of a Windows Service much easier and adds makes deployment somewhat easier too.

Check it out: http://topshelf-project.com/

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