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I'm not sure why it's saying it's not initialized, I clearly did with, that, char typeOfWash, tireShine; line, right? My code works just fine as long as the input isn't 'g','G','p', or 'P'. I haven't put in the last case for if typeOfWash == anything else then print "invalid selection", but that's easy and I'll drop that in later.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
//variable declarations 
char typeOfWash, tireShine;

//Menu
printf("R ---> Regular ($5.00)\n");
printf("B ---> Bronze ($7.50)\n");
printf("G ---> Gold ($10.25)\n");
printf("P ---> Platinum ($15.00)\n");
printf("Tire Shine can be added to the Gold or Platinum ONLY,");
printf("for an additional$2.50\n\n");

printf("Enter your selection: ");
scanf("%c",&typeOfWash);

switch (typeOfWash)
{
    case 'R': case 'r':
        printf("Your bill total is: $5.00\n");
        break;
    case 'B': case 'b':
        printf("Your bill total is: $7.50\n");
        break;
    case 'G': case 'g':
        printf("Would you Like a Tire Shine? (Y/N): ");
        scanf("%c",tireShine);
        if (tireShine == 'Y' || tireShine == 'y')
            printf("Your bill total is: $12.75");
        else
            printf("Your bill total is: $10.25");
        break;
    case 'P': case 'p':
        printf("Would you Like a Tire Shine? (Y/N): ");
        scanf("%c",tireShine);
        if (tireShine == 'Y' || tireShine == 'y')
            printf("Your bill total is: $17.50");
        else
            printf("Your bill total is: $15.00");
        break;
}
return 0;
}
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You are confusing initialization and declaration. –  CrazyCasta Sep 26 '12 at 9:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to change:

    scanf("%c",tireShine);

to:

    scanf("%c", &tireShine);

(in two places). Reason: scanf (and C functions in general) need a pointer to any variable that are going to be modified.

It's also good practice (defensive programming) to explicitly initialise your variables, e.g. change:

char typeOfWash, tireShine;

to:

char typeOfWash = 'R';
char tireShine = 'N';
share|improve this answer
    
Even with this change, scanf() may still fail and tireShine will be left uninitialized. Pre-initializing solves it. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 26 '12 at 7:38

I clearly did with, that, "char typeOfWash, tireShine" line, right?

No, local definitions do not initialize variables unless there is an explicit initializer.

But that's not your real problem. Your real problem is that you're calling scanf, which you intend to set tireShine, incorrectly. Use

scanf("%c", &tireShine);

to read into it. Also, if you are using gcc, use the -Wall flag and it will warn about such misuses.

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This is incorrect:

scanf("%c",tireShine);

you need to pass the address of tireShine (which you have already done for typeOfWash):

scanf("%c", &tireShine);

Note that this:

char typeOfWash, tireShine; 

is a declaration definition, it does not provide initial values for either of the variables and is therefore not initialisation.

share|improve this answer
1  
Strictly speaking that is a definition, not a declaration - it's just a definition that lacks an initialiser. –  Paul R Sep 26 '12 at 7:27
    
@PaulR, corrected. Thanks. –  hmjd Sep 26 '12 at 7:27

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