Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a microcontroller project sending serial data frames of 8-bytes in length to my PC vie monitored the data frames from the microcontroller using a PC serial monitor tool and all the data looks okay each 8-byte frame seems to be consistently sending data in this pattern 8-bytes in length.

The problem im experiencing is the following:

Every time I read the serial data the 1-st byte in the 8-byte data frame structured is not present.

Example:

Each loop the following below :

Mircocontroller sends 8-byte frame : 01 FF 8E 01 00 00 00 0A

  1. First loop iteration.

    .NET Serial PORT receives data frame : 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

    Read(buff, 0, 8); reads 1-byte read

  2. Second loop iteration.

.NET Serial PORT receives data frame : FF 8E 01 00 00 00 0A 00 (7-byte read)

Read(buff, 0, 8); reads 7-byte read

Im expecting sr.Read(buff, 0, 8) to always read 8-bytes in length for every loop iteration.

Here is the code im using to read from serial PORT

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (SerialPort sr = new SerialPort("COM5"))
        {
            sr.BaudRate = 9600;
            sr.DataBits = 8;
            sr.Parity = Parity.None;
            sr.StopBits = StopBits.One;
            sr.Open();
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

            while (true)
            {
                byte[] buff = new byte[8];
                int r =  sr.Read(buff, 0, 8);
                Console.WriteLine("Number of bytes read : " + r);
                for (int i = 0; i < buff.Length; i++)
                {
                    var hex = string.Format("{0:x2}", buff[i]);
                    sb.Append(hex.ToUpper());
                    sb.Append(" ");
                }
                Console.WriteLine(sb);
                sb.Clear();
            }
        }

Thank you in advance.


Thanks for the feedback everyone very informative.

I've reconstructed buffering logic for the 8-byte frame as follows:

Everything seems to be in sync with the data pattern I see on from the port monitor and mostly importantly, what's coming from the microcontroller.

Important aspects are still missing:

  1. Frame CRC.
  2. Validating the order of each byte.
  3. ....... ect

    Here is updated code

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (SerialPort sr = new SerialPort("COM5"))
        {
            sr.BaudRate = 9600;
            sr.DataBits = 8;
            sr.Parity = Parity.None;
            sr.StopBits = StopBits.One;
            sr.Handshake = Handshake.None;
            sr.DtrEnable = false;
            sr.Open();
            sr.ReceivedBytesThreshold = 1;
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    
            byte[] buff = new byte[8];
            byte[] temp_buffer = new byte[8];
    
            while (true)
            {
                int r = sr.Read(temp_buffer, 0, 8);
                Console.WriteLine("Number of bytes read : " + r);
    
                // 1 - byte from the serial frame ?
                if (r == 1)
                {
                    buff[0] = temp_buffer[0];
                }
    
                // 7 - bytes from the serial frame ?
                if (r == 7)
                {
                    // get the remaining 7 - bytes 
                    for (int i = 0; i <= temp_buffer.Length - 1; i++)
                    {
    
                        if (i != 0)
                            buff[i] = temp_buffer[i]; // construct a complete frame 
                    }
    
                    // okay, we ready to display the 8-byte serial frame. 
                    for (int i = 0; i < buff.Length; i++)
                    {
                        var hex = string.Format("{0:x2}", buff[i]);
                        sb.Append(hex.ToUpper());
                        sb.Append(" ");
                    }
    
                    Console.WriteLine(sb);
                    sb.Clear();
                }
            }
    
        }
    }
    

Also here is a modified version, reading a 16-byte serial frame.

        using (SerialPort sr = new SerialPort("COM5"))
        {
            sr.BaudRate = 9600;
            sr.DataBits = 8;
            sr.Parity = Parity.None;
            sr.StopBits = StopBits.One;
            sr.Open();
            sr.ReceivedBytesThreshold = 1;
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

            byte[] io_buffer = new byte[16];
            byte[] temp_buffer = new byte[16];

            do
            {
                int data_length = sr.Read( temp_buffer, 0, 16 );

                // 1 - Byte from the serial frame ?
                if ( data_length == 1 && temp_buffer[ 0 ] == 0x28 )
                {
                    io_buffer[ 0 ] = temp_buffer[ 0 ];
                }

                // 15 - Bytes from the serial frame ?
                if (data_length == 15 && temp_buffer[14] == 0x29)
                {

                    // Here we construct the 16- byte frame.(start from 1 as we already have our start frame stored) "x028" => ")"
                    for ( int i = 1; i < temp_buffer.Length; i++ )
                    {
                        io_buffer[ i ] = temp_buffer[ i - 1 ];
                    }

                    // okay, we ready to display the 16-byte serial frame. 
                    for ( int i = 0; i < io_buffer.Length; i++ )
                    {
                        var hex = string.Format( "{0:x2}", io_buffer[ i ] );
                        sb.Append( hex.ToUpper() );
                        sb.Append( " " );
                    }

                    Console.WriteLine(sb);
                    sb.Clear();

                }
            } while (sr.IsOpen);

Here is the 16-byte frame output , 4-th byte indicates the channel 0 to 3 from the (I/O 4-channel analog to digital convertor)

28 FF FF 00 01 DB 00 00 00 00 00 00 0E 00 00 29

28 FF FF 01 01 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 0E 00 00 29

28 FF FF 02 01 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 0E 00 00 29

28 FF FF 03 01 A8 00 00 00 00 00 00 0E 00 00 29

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! If you found any of the answers helpful, please upvote and / or accept an answer. This is the way people are rewarded for helping others out. –  Chimera Sep 26 '12 at 19:32
    
You shouldn't add "answers" to your own question in order to ask follow up questions. –  TJD Sep 26 '12 at 23:29

4 Answers 4

Im expecting sr.Read(buff, 0, 8) to always read 8-bytes in length for every loop iteration.

This is an unfounded expectation. Read method (and the underlying Win32 routine) reads the data available in port's input buffer. If there's available 1 byte, than you can read 1 byte or less.

The availability of data depends on whole number of factors, and Read method can't influence on them. You should build the data packet at receiver side yourself.

P. S. Yes, reading from the communication line (socket, serial port, etc.) is much harder, than writing to that line.

share|improve this answer

You have no guarantee that you'll be synchronised with the device sending bytes when you call sr.Read() initially.

I'd have thought you would want to call sr.Read repeatedly into a buffer. Then slide an 8-byte wide window over the buffer until you find 8 bytes that match the protocol you're expecting. Now discard everything before the window, and read chunks of 8 bytes, starting with the (now) start of your buffer. You're then "synchronised" with your protocol. Implement your logic on top of this (maybe fire an event for every valid 8-byte group received and handle it one layer up).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip. i will try that. –  user1070829 Sep 26 '12 at 11:16

When a device "sends a frame" it simply means that it starts sending bytes. You will receive the bytes in the order sent, but the timing is not guaranteed - the operating system will gather up bytes for a while and then (to reduce delays in your processing) send them on to you. It has no way of knowing when the frame is "finished" - you can thus be given a partial packet while there is more data still queued up to be sent by the device. Your code needs to interpret the data stream to break it down into frames.

In your example, you receive 1 byte followed by 7 bytes. It is up to you to buffer those bytes until you have enough to build a complete frame of 8 bytes that you can then decode.

If you get transmission errors you may also have to deal with incomplete frames (you might only get the last 5 bytes of a frame - you will need to discard them and start reading the next valid frame) or corrupted data (the frame appears to arrive intact but some of the bytes in it have incorrect values - in this case if the frame includes a CRC or other consistency check you can validate it and discard invalid frames, but if there is no information that helps you to verify the frame you will just have to hope that transmission is clear).

Basically the serial port just provides a stream of bytes that arrive in sporadic bursts - it's up to your code to implement any data encodings and protocols that are applied to that data stream.

share|improve this answer

The sr.Read(temp_buffer, 0, 8) will read up to 8 bytes from the buffer, it is a max number so that you do not overwrite your temp_buffer. If you want to read 8 bytes, you have to wait for at least 8 bytes. This can be accomplished by BytesToRead method and/or ReceivedBytesThreshold.

If you set the ReceivedBytesThreshold to 8, when the event fires you know you will have at least 8 bytes to read. If you want to wait for 8 Bytes you could poll the BytesToRead property and when it reaches 8, execute the read.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.