Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to nest a if/else inside a case switch statement. When I enter case 'p' or 'P' no matter what character is typed the $15.00 line is printed. I have tried moving/adding {}'s with no change in output.

Thanks for taking time to help a noob out.

Entire code now here.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
//variable declarations 
char typeOfWash, tireShine;

//Menu
printf("R ---> Regular ($5.00)\n");
printf("B ---> Bronze ($7.50)\n");
printf("G ---> Gold ($10.25)\n");
printf("P ---> Platinum ($15.00)\n");
printf("Tire Shine can be added to the Gold or Platinum ONLY,");
printf("for an additional$2.50\n\n");

printf("Enter your selection: ");
scanf("%c",&typeOfWash);

switch (typeOfWash)
{
    case 'R': case 'r':
        printf("Your bill total is: $5.00\n");
        break;
    case 'B': case 'b':
        printf("Your bill total is: $7.50\n");
        break;
    case 'G': case 'g':
        printf("Would you Like a Tire Shine? (Y/N): ");
        scanf("%c ",&tireShine);
        if (tireShine == 'Y' || tireShine == 'y')
            printf("Your bill total is: $12.75\n");
        else
            printf("Your bill total is: $10.25\n");
        break;
    case 'P': case 'p':
        printf("Would you Like a Tire Shine? (Y/N): ");
        scanf("%c ",&tireShine);
        printf("%c",tireShine);
        if (tireShine == 'Y' || tireShine == 'y')
            printf("Your bill total is: $17.50\n");
        else
            printf("Your bill total is: $15.00\n");
        break;
    default:
        printf("Invalid Choice");

}
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you print out the value of tireShine? –  Scooter Sep 26 '12 at 7:52
    
Also, you can do if ( toupper(tireShine) == 'Y' ) –  Scooter Sep 26 '12 at 7:52
1  
Your 15$ or 17.5$ depends upon Y or y but not on P or p. –  عثمان غني Sep 26 '12 at 7:55
    
what's "toupper"? –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 7:56
    
toupper() returns the upper case of the ASCII char you invoke it with. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 26 '12 at 7:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that using scanf with the %c format specifier results in white space not being consumed, which in your case results in a \n being left in the input buffer. What your instructor seems to have suggested is to eat the trailing white space from the initial input with the next scanf; however, I suspect that they said to insert a leading space rather than a trailing space as this fixes your problem:

scanf(" %c", &tireShine);

Alternatively, you could use getchar() immidiately before your second scanf and consume the new line character beforehand:

getchar();
scanf("%c", &tireShine);

A second alternative would be to use the %s format specifier instead of %c and handle it accordingly.

Be warned that getchar() will only consume one character from the input buffer. If a user were to input a string longer than 1 character, for example, you would need to have something like while ((x = getchar()) != '\n') ; to clear the buffer.

share|improve this answer

You have one more space.

Change

scanf("%c ", &tireShine);

to

scanf("%c", &tireShine);
share|improve this answer
    
I need the space or it doesn't allow for user input. And that's how my instructure said to do it for now. –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:05
    
@user1699174 Why it doesn't allow for use input? Check the tireShine right after scanf see what you get. –  xdazz Sep 26 '12 at 8:10
    
just tried to print right after scanf() and it skips it and prints $15 line. –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:16
    
@user1699174: It doesn't skip it, it prints the \n that the scanf read into tireShine. If you remove the printf, you should notice that your "Would you like..." and "Your bill..." should be on the same line. –  tojrobinson Sep 26 '12 at 9:46

Try inline if.

case 'P': case 'p':
    printf("Would you Like a Tire Shine? (Y/N): ");
    scanf("%c",&tireShine);
    printf("Your bill total is: $%s\n", toUpper(tireShine) == 'Y' ? "17.50":"15.00");
    break;
share|improve this answer
    
Tried that, output for P to enter case, then Y, is: $15.000000 –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:06
    
is tireShine a char * or a char? Because in the case of char * you should try check "Y" and it the case of char you should check 'Y'. –  fonZ Sep 26 '12 at 8:11
    
it's just a char, please see the OP again. I put my full code there. –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:21
    
Does the same happen if you put a char * in there, i mean a string? char* tireShine and scanf("%s",tireShine); and ofcourse then check for "Y" or "y" –  fonZ Sep 26 '12 at 8:33
    
char* tireShine; in variable declaration? –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:38

Try this::

printf("Enter your selection: ");
scanf("%c",&typeOfWash);
fflush(stdin) ;

But avoid using it. UPDATED::

printf("Enter your selection: ");
scanf("%c",&typeOfWash);
getchar() ;

As, fflush(stdin) will result in UNDEFINED BEHAVIOR, you can use getchar() to clear the stream.

share|improve this answer
    
We have a winner! Thanks for everyone who played along. Now what exactly is this? and how does it work? –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:46
    
It worked. Why avoid using it? what else would I have done to fix my problem? –  CorySTG Sep 26 '12 at 8:48
    
This is not a winning answer. fflush(stdin) ; shouldn't be used frequently. Try googling it. fflush flushes the data at stream to be forced to be written. –  Abhineet Sep 26 '12 at 8:49
    
-1. This is wrong. fflush(stdin) results in Undefined Behavior. –  Alok Save Sep 26 '12 at 8:49
1  
The answer from tojrobinson is better than mine. –  Abhineet Sep 26 '12 at 9:28

One problem with scanf() is that it typically leaves the 'return' unread. Therefore if you enter something like a 'p' then a 'return', it reads and processes the 'p' but not the 'return'. The second call to scanf() reads the 'return' char which was already there and so it does not match 'y' or 'Y'. You have the same problem on case 'g'. It does not matter if you use "%c" or "%c ". This problem may be worse on DOS systems which have two chars to mark the end of line.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.