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I have defined my own expection class:

public class ProduktException extends Exception {

    public ProduktException(String msg){
    //null
    }

    public static void throwProduktNotCreatedException() throws ProduktException {
        throw new ProduktException("Cannot be created!");
    }

    public static void throwProduktNotDeletedException () throws ProduktException {
        throw new ProduktException("Cannot be deleted!");
    }
}

My Problem is I do not know how to throw them when I try:

try {
...
} catch(ProduktNotDeletedException e) {
    e.toString();
}

That does not work... But I want to have these structure! What is wrong?

I appreaciate your answer!!!

UPDATE:

My Problem is, I do not want to create several Exception Klasses I want to have all Exceptions in one class. Is there possibly a solution for that?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean it does not work? You convert the exception to a string which you immediately throw away. Of course nothing is going to happen. –  Cubic Sep 26 '12 at 8:08
2  
Is it ProduktNotDeletedException or ProduktException? Why do you call toString and then do nothing with it? Why don't you pass the msg along to the super constructor? And what exactly is not working? –  Thilo Sep 26 '12 at 8:08
    
Thx for your response!!! The problem is I want to throw f.ex.: a specific ProduktNotDeletedException and not the ProduktException. Therefore, how to do that without making a new class for each exception? –  maximus Sep 26 '12 at 8:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to differentiate between different kinds of exceptions, just create 2 different exceptions, maybe something like:

public class ProduktException extends Exception
{
    public ProduktException(String msg){
    //null
    }
}

Then have:

public class ProduktNotDeletedException extends ProduktException
{
    ....
}

and

public class ProduktNotCreatedException extends ProduktException
{
    ....
}

Then you can catch one or the other, or both.

try {
    ...
} catch(ProduktNotDeletedException e1) {
    e1.toString();
} catch(ProduktNotCreatedException e2) {
    e2.toString();
} 

EDIT:

For a single class what I mean is:

public class ProduktException extends Exception {

    boolean notDeleted;
    boolean notCreated;

    public ProduktException(String msg){
        super(msg);
    }

    public boolean isNotDeleted() {
        return(notDeleted);
    }

    public boolean isNotCreated() {
        return(notCreated);
    }

    public static void throwProduktNotCreatedException() throws ProduktException {
        ProduktException e = new ProduktException("Cannot be created!");
        e.notCreated = true;
        throw e;
    }

    public static void throwProduktNotDeletedException () throws ProduktException {
        ProduktException e = new ProduktException("Cannot be deleted!");
        e.notDeleted = true;
        throw e;
    }
}

Then in your try/catch:

try {
    ...
} catch(ProduktException e) {
    e.toString();
    if(e.isNotCreated()) {
        // do something
    }
    if(e.isNotDeleted()) {
        // do something
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
is there probably a way without making different new classes and put everything in one class? –  maximus Sep 26 '12 at 8:12
    
@maximus You can create a specific method or a field maybe. like isNotDeleted() and isNotCreated(), which you can check inside your catch{} block. –  Jon Lin Sep 26 '12 at 8:13
    
thx for your answer!!! but I not really understanding what do you mean? Could you give an example? –  maximus Sep 26 '12 at 8:15
    
@maximus I've added an example for a specific field. –  Jon Lin Sep 26 '12 at 8:27
    
@Jon Lin The problem with this is that he will have to update his Exception class and add a new method every time he wants to create a new exception type. This could add up to quite a few methods if he has many exception types. –  Christina Sep 26 '12 at 8:44

You need to either catch ProduktException, e.g.

try {
  ...
} catch (ProduktException e) {
  e.toString();
}

or declare subtypes, e.g.

public ProduktNotDeletedException extends ProduktException

You'll probably want to pass the message in the constructor up, so add the following in your constructor:

super(msg);
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The Syntax given below.

class RangeException extends Exception
{
    String msg;

    RangeException()
    {
        msg = new String("Enter a number between 10 and 100");
    }
}

public class MyCustomException
{
    public static void main (String args [])
    {
        try
        {
            int x = 1;

            if (x < 10 || x >100) throw new RangeException();
        }
        catch(RangeException e)
        {
            System.out.println (e);
        }
    }
}
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Check out given link: stackoverflow.com/questions/8423700/… –  Yogendra Joshi Sep 26 '12 at 8:23

What you could do if you don't want to create multiple subclasses of your ProduktException for each different type of exception you need to throw is to include a code in the exception which will let you know what is wrong. Something like this:

public class ProduktException extends Exception {
    private Code exceptionCode;  
    private String message 

    public ProduktException(Code code, String msg){
        this.message = msg;
        this.exceptionCode = code;
    }  

    //Getters and setters for exceptionCode and message      
}

Code can be an enum so that your application can know that each code corresponds to a specific "problem" (product not created, product not deleted, etc.). You can then throw your exceptions like this

throw new ProduktException(Code.PRODUCT_NOT_CREATED, 
                     "Error while creating product");

And when you catch it you can differentiate based on the code.

catch (ProduktException ex) {
    if (ex.getExceptionCode().equals(Code.PRODUCT_NOT_CREATED)) {
        ...
    }
    else {
        ...
    }
}
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