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How do you come up with a hash function for a generic object? There is the constraint that two objects need to have the same hash value if they are "equal" as defined by the user. How does Java accomplish this?

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The developer accomplishes this. If the developer doesn't do this, Java won't correct them or fail to compile. I suggest you have a look at the classes under java.lang.* and java.util.* to see how it is done there. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 26 '12 at 8:24
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hashing of an object is established by overriding hashCode() method, which the developer can override.

The hashCode should return a distinct integer for distinct object. Java does this by using prime numbers in the hashcode calculation to bring distinct integer value.

If the equals() and hashCode() method aren't implemented, the JVM will generate hashcode implicitly for the object (for Serializable classes, a serialVersionUID is generated).

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Actually, this not correct. You don't have to return distinct integers for distinct object and as Joshua Bloch states in his Effective Java book, finding a good algorithm is still a research topic. The only requirements are to return the same integer for equal objects and that the hashCode shouldn't change if the object doesn't change. E.g. a bad but correct implementation is to return a constant value. (Bad because some algorithms, which rely on hashCode will degenerate to iterating over lists.) –  Puce Sep 26 '12 at 8:43
    
@Puce, so you're telling me that Object A and B can have identical hashCode()? For equal objects, yes, the hashCode returns the same value, but the value must be distinct for classes. –  Buhake Sindi Sep 26 '12 at 8:48
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No, the don't have to be distinct :-) The hashCode is usually used to group objects in "buckets". If all objects have the same hashCode, all objects end in the same "bucket". The hashCode is used because it is faster to compare integers than objects. But it's only use as a pre-selection. All objects in the same "bucket" will be compared using the equals method. If you have a good hashCode method and hashCodes don't clash by chance, then you have only one object per bucket -> very efficient. If all objects return the same hashCode all end up in the same "bucket" -> iterate over the list. –  Puce Sep 26 '12 at 8:54
    
Or from the Javadoc: •It is not required that if two objects are unequal according to the equals(java.lang.Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce distinct integer results. However, the programmer should be aware that producing distinct integer results for unequal objects may improve the performance of hash tables. –  Puce Sep 26 '12 at 8:56
    
@Puce, updated my post... –  Buhake Sindi Sep 26 '12 at 8:58
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I just found the answer to my own question. The way Java does it is that it defines a hashCode for every object and by default the hashCode for two objects are the same iff the two objects are the same in memory. So when the client of the hashtable overrides the equals() method for an object, he should also override the method that computes hashcode such that if a.equals(b) is true, then a.hashCode() must also equal b.hashCode(). This way, it is assured that equal objects have the same hashcode.

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iff isn't exactly true here. –  Louis Wasserman Sep 26 '12 at 17:22
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Java doesn't do that. If the hashCode() and equals() are not explicitly implemented, JVM will generate different hashCodes for meaningfully equal instances. You can check Effective Java by Joshua Bloch. It's really helpful.

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First, basically you define the hash function of a class by overriding the hashCode() method. The Javadoc states:

The general contract of hashCode is:

  • Whenever it is invoked on the same object more than once during an execution of a Java application, the hashCode method must consistently return the same integer, provided no information used in equals comparisons on the object is modified. This integer need not remain consistent from one execution of an application to another execution of the same application.
  • If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce the same integer result.
  • It is not required that if two objects are unequal according to the equals(java.lang.Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce distinct integer results. However, the programmer should be aware that producing distinct integer results for unequal objects may improve the performance of hash tables.

So the more important question is: What makes two of your objects equal? Or vice versa: What properties make your objects unique? If you have an answer to that, create an equals() method that compares all of the properties and returns true if they're all the same and false otherwise.

The hashCode() method is a bit more involved, I would suggest that you do not create it yourself but let your IDE do it. In Eclipse, you can select Source and then Generate hashCode() and equals() from the menu. This also guarantees that the requirements from above hold.


Here is a small (and simplified) example where the two methods have been generated using Eclipse. Notice that I chose not to include the city property since the zipCode already uniquely identifies the city within a country.

public class Address {

    private String streetAndNumber;
    private String zipCode;
    private String city;
    private String country;

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((country == null) ? 0 : country.hashCode());
        result = prime * result
                + ((streetAndNumber == null) ? 0 : streetAndNumber.hashCode());
        result = prime * result + ((zipCode == null) ? 0 : zipCode.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
        if(this == obj)
            return true;
        if(obj == null)
            return false;
        if(!(obj instanceof Address))
            return false;
        final Address other = (Address) obj;
        if(country == null) {
            if(other.country != null)
                return false;
        }
        else if(!country.equals(other.country))
            return false;
        if(streetAndNumber == null) {
            if(other.streetAndNumber != null)
                return false;
        }
        else if(!streetAndNumber.equals(other.streetAndNumber))
            return false;
        if(zipCode == null) {
            if(other.zipCode != null)
                return false;
        }
        else if(!zipCode.equals(other.zipCode))
            return false;
        return true;
    }
}
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Several options:

  • read Effective Java, by Joshua Bloch. It contains a good algorithm for hash codes
  • let your IDE generate the hashCode method
  • Java SE 7 and greater: use Objects.hash
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The class java.lang.Object cheats. It defines equality (as is determined by equals) as being object identity (as can be determined by ==). So, unless you override equals in your subclass, two instances of your class are "equal", if they happen to be the same object.

The associated hash code for this is implemented by the system function System.identityHashCode (which is no longer really based on object addresses -- was it ever? -- but can be thought of as being implemented this way).

If you override equals, then this implementation of hashCode no longer makes sense.

Consider the following example:

class Identifier {

    private final int lower;
    private final int upper;

    public boolean equals(Object any) {
        if (any == this) return true;
        else if (!(any instanceof Identifier)) return false;
        else {
            final Identifier id = (Identifier)any;
            return lower == id.lower && upper == id.upper;
        }
    }
}

Two instances of this class are considered equal, if their "lower" and "upper" members have the same values. Since equality is now determined by object members, we need to define hashCode in a compatible way.

public int hashCode() {
    return lower * 31 + upper;  // possible implementation, maybe not too sophisticated though
}

As you can see, we use the same fields in hashCode which we also use when we determine equality. It is generally a good idea to base the hash code on all members, which are also considered when comparing for equality.

Consider this example instead:

class EmailAddress {

    private final String mailbox;
    private final String displayName;

    public boolean equals(Object any) {
        if (any == this) return true;
        else if (!(any instanceof EmailAddress)) return false;
        else {
            final EmailAddress id = (EmailAddress)any;
            return mailbox.equals(id.mailbox);
        }
    }
}

Since here, equality is only determined by the mailbox member, the hash code should also only be based on that member:

public int hashCode() {
    return mailbox.hashCode();
}
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