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I want to see your ideas on a efficient way to check values of a newly serialized object.

Example I have an xml document I have serialized into an object, now I want to do value checks. First and most basic idea I can think of is to use nested if statments and checks each property, could be from one value checking that it has he correct url format, to checking another proprieties value that is a date but making sue it is in the correct range etc.

So my question is how would people do checks on all values in an object? Type checks are not important as this is already taken care of it is more to do with the value itself. It needs to be for quite large objects this is why I did not really want to use nested if statements.

Edit:

I want to achieve complete value validation on all properties in a given object.

I want to check the value it self not that it is null. I want to check the value for specific things if i have, an object with many properties one is of type string and named homepage.

I want to be able to check that the string in the in the correct URL format if not fail. This is just one example in the same object I could check that a date is in a given range if any are not I will return false or some form of fail.

I am using c# .net 4.

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Could you please post some example code for us to work with and what you want the values to be or how you determine what the values should be etc. this isn't enough to propose a detailed enough solution. –  LukeHennerley Sep 26 '12 at 8:43
    
What do you mean value check? or check whether Date == null? or specified value –  Cuong Le Sep 26 '12 at 8:44
    
sorry i though the example would be enough, because I asking techniques on how you would approach it. My aim is to have an object and you crack that object open and check its values. Does example code help with this. It is more about the approach then the code. –  user101010101 Sep 26 '12 at 8:45
    
Is it for the purpose of unit testing the de-serialization logic? –  Vitaliy Sep 26 '12 at 8:48
    
it is for neither I was trying to give context on why this would be done. I just have an object and want to do complete value validation and fail if it does not pass there and then. –  user101010101 Sep 26 '12 at 8:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public class Validator<T>
{
    List<Func<T,bool>> _verifiers = new List<Func<T, bool>>();

    public void AddPropertyValidator(Func<T, bool> propValidator) 
    {
        _verifiers.Add(propValidator);
    }

    public bool IsValid(T objectToValidate)
    {
         try {
         return _verifiers.All(pv => pv(objectToValidate));
         } catch(Exception) {
            return false;
         }
    }
}

class ExampleObject {
     public string Name {get; set;}
     public int BirthYear { get;set;}
}


public static void Main(string[] args) 
{
    var validator = new Validator<ExampleObject>();
    validator.AddPropertyValidator(o => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(o.Name));
    validator.AddPropertyValidator(o => o.BirthYear > 1900 && o.BirthYear < DateTime.Now.Year );
    validator.AddPropertyValidator(o => o.Name.Length > 3);

    validator.Validate(new ExampleObject());
}
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1  
Nice mockup! You never return the results in IsValid(). You might want to opt out quickly if one validator returns false. You have a typo in List<Func<T,bool> where you are missing a >. I don't like that the Validator AND its functions are both called Validators (maybe Validator and Check or Validator and ValidatorFunction or whatever). –  Ricky Helgesson Sep 26 '12 at 9:19
    
Is this more efficient than a number of if blocks. Aren't you just moving the logic into lambdas and adding a layer of abstraction? –  Jodrell Sep 26 '12 at 9:41
    
@RickyHelgesson: Thanks for pointing out typos etc. This was meant as a mockup, but it should of course compile. –  faester Sep 26 '12 at 9:57
    
@Jodrell This is certainly less efficient than a number of if blocks. It has IMHO two advantages: One is readability and the other is the ability to plug in specific property validators. Making the bits and pieces modular would make it easier to change logic runtime, inject values using IoC. But this is clearly just a sketch, and for these purposes validation frameworks might be preferable. –  faester Sep 26 '12 at 10:02

Try to use Fluent Validation, it is separation of concerns and configure validation out of your object

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I think it depends on the nature of the efficiency you are looking for but this should certainly help to make you productive, and save wheel reinvention. +1 –  Jodrell Sep 26 '12 at 9:47

I suggest using Automapper with a ValueResolver. You can deserialize the XML into an object in a very elegant way using autommaper and check if the values you get are valid with a ValueResolver.

You can use a base ValueResolver that check for Nulls or invalid casts, and some CustomResolver's that check if the Values you get are correct. It might not be exacly what you are looking for, but I think it's an elegant way to do it.

Check this out here: http://dannydouglass.com/2010/11/06/simplify-using-xml-data-with-automapper-and-linqtoxml

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In functional languages, such as Haskell, your problem could be solved with the Maybe-monad:

The Maybe monad embodies the strategy of combining a chain of computations that may each return Nothing by ending the chain early if any step produces Nothing as output. It is useful when a computation entails a sequence of steps that depend on one another, and in which some steps may fail to return a value.

Replace Nothing with null, and the same thing applies for C#.

There are several ways to try and solve the problem, none of them are particularly pretty. If you want a runtime-validation that something is not null, you could use an AOP framework to inject null-checking code into your type. Otherwise you would really have to end up doing nested if checks for null, which is not only ugly, it will probably violate the Law of Demeter.

As a compromise, you could use a Maybe-monad like set of extension methods, which would allow you to query the object, and choose what to do in case one of the properties is null.

Have a look at this article by Dmitri Nesteruk: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/109026/Chained-null-checks-and-the-Maybe-monad

Hope that helps.

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How do you know null is invalid? –  Jodrell Sep 26 '12 at 9:17

I assume your question is: How do I efficiently check whether my object is valid?

If so, it does not matter that your object was just deserialized from some text source. If your question regards checking the object while deserializing to quickly stop deserializing if an error is found, that is another issue and you should update your question.

Validating an object efficiently is not often discussed when it comes to C# and administrative tools. The reason is that it is very quick no matter how you do it. It is more common to discuss how to do the checks in a manner that is easy to read and easily maintained.

Since your question is about efficiency, here are some ideas:

  • If you have a huge number of objects to be checked and performance is of key importance, you might want to change your objects into arrays of data so that they can be checked in a consistent manner. Example:

Instead of having MyObject[] MyObjects where MyObject has a lot of properties, break out each property and put them into an array like this:

int[] MyFirstProperties
float[] MySecondProperties

This way, the loop that traverses the list and checks the values, can be as quick as possible and you will not have many cache misses in the CPU cache, since you loop forward in the memory. Just be sure to use regular arrays or lists that are not implemented as linked lists, since that is likely to generate a lot of cache misses.

  • If you do not want to break up your objects into arrays of properties, it seems that top speed is not of interest but almost top speed. Then, your best bet is to keep your objects in a serial array and do:

.

bool wasOk = true;
foreach (MyObject obj in MyObjects)
{
    if (obj.MyFirstProperty == someBadValue)
    {
        wasOk = false;
        break;
    }
    if (obj.MySecondProperty == someOtherBadValue)
    {
        wasOk = false;
        break;
    }
}

This checks whether all your objects' properties are ok. I am not sure what your case really is but I think you get the point. Speed is already great when it comes to just checking properties of an object.

If you do string compares, make sure that you use x = y where possible, instead of using more sophisticated string compares, since x = y has a few quick opt outs, like if any of them is null, return, if the memory address is the same, the strings are equal and a few more clever things if I remember correctly. For any Java guy reading this, do not do this in Java!!! It will work sometimes but not always.

If I did not answer your question, you need to improve your question.

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I'm not certain I understand the depth of your question but, wouldn't you just do somthing like this,

public SomeClass
{
    private const string UrlValidatorRegex = "http://...

    private const DateTime MinValidSomeDate = ...
    private const DateTime MaxValidSomeDate = ...

    public string SomeUrl { get; set; }

    public DateTime SomeDate { get; set; }

    ...

    private ValidationResult ValidateProperties()
    {
        var urlValidator = new RegEx(urlValidatorRegex);
        if (!urlValidator.IsMatch(this.Someurl))
        {
            return new ValidationResult
                {
                    IsValid = false,
                    Message = "SomeUrl format invalid."
                };
        }

        if (this.SomeDate < MinValidSomeDate 
            || this.SomeDate > MinValidSomeDate)
        {
            return new ValidationResult
                {
                    IsValid = false,
                    Message = "SomeDate outside permitted bounds."
                };
        }

        ...
        // Check other fields and properties here, return false on failure.
        ...

        return new ValidationResult
                {
                    IsValid = true,
                };
    }

    ...

    private struct ValidationResult
    {
        public bool IsValid;
        public string Message;
    }
}

The exact valdiation code would vary depending on how you would like your class to work, no? Consider a property of a familar type,

public string SomeString { get; set; }

What are the valid values for this property. Both null and string.Empty may or may not be valid depending on the Class adorned with the property. There may be maximal length that should be allowed but, these details would vary by implementation.


If any suggested answer is more complicated than code above without offering an increase in performance or functionality, can it be more efficient?

Is your question actually, how can I check the values on an object without having to write much code?

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