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Common Language Specification is quite strict on method overloads.

Methods are allowed to be overloaded only based on the number and types of their parameters, and in the case of generic methods, the number of their generic parameters.

Why is this code CLS compliant (no CS3006 warning) according to csc?

using System;

[assembly: CLSCompliant (true)]

public class Test {
    public static void Expect<T>(T arg)
    {
    }

    public static void Expect<T>(ref T arg)
    {
    }

    public static void Main ()
    {
    }
}
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Because a reference to a type is not the same as the type itself. For myself I always just look at comparison between T and ref T as the same as T vs T* (even though they are semantically different, it helps me to organize the difference in my C-wired brain) –  Jason Larke Sep 26 '12 at 8:57
    
Clearly this is because you use generic methods. Generics are heavily non-compliant but too useful to throw out. The specs are silent about this. –  Hans Passant Sep 26 '12 at 11:56

2 Answers 2

This is CLS-compliant because the types differ. The rules for overloading are requiring one (or more) of the criteria to be met, not all of them at the same time.

A ref T (or out T, which is using the same with same type different semantics) is declaring a "reference" to a T reference (for classes) or the instance (in case of value types).

For more details, look up the Type.MakeByRefType() method - it creates the type representing a reference to the original type, e.g. for a T this returns a T& (in C++ notation).

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Right, the CLS is not written from a C# perspective. The fact that the parameters have the same type in C# isn't relevant. –  hvd Sep 26 '12 at 9:21
    
T& is how such type would be called in CIL too. –  svick Sep 26 '12 at 9:23
    
@hvd, exactly, it is actually more a syntax thing; it's because there is no other notation for reference types. The difference between ref and out is only an attribute added to the parameter, which "tells" the C# compiler that the method will always set the value, therefore passing in uninitialized values is OK. –  Lucero Sep 26 '12 at 9:23
    
I think you are missing the point of CLS, it knows nothing about ref/out. From MSDN CS3006 description "A method does not cannot be overloaded based on the ref or out parameter and still comply with the Common Language Specification (CLS)." –  Marek Safar Sep 26 '12 at 9:31
1  
@marek.safar Why not? The parameters really do have different types. One has type int, the other has type int&, and overloading on different types is allowed. Or are you saying that the function is written in C#, in C# the types are both int, so it's not allowed? Would that mean that the equivalent in CIL, which results in a bitwise identical assembly, is CLS compliant? –  hvd Sep 26 '12 at 11:16

To be clear, in general, overloaded methods differing only in ref or out, or in array rank, are not CLS-compliant, according to MSDN.

You can verify the compiler does indeed check for this specific case by writing a simple non-generic version:

using System;

[assembly: CLSCompliant (true)]

public class Test {
    public static void Expect(int arg)
    {
    }

    public static void Expect(ref int arg)
    {
    }

    public static void Main ()
    {
    }
}

However, you seem to have hit upon a compiler edge-case, since if you add in the generic method overloads, the compiler doesn't seem to complain.

I would say this is either a bug in the compiler (as in this similar question), or there is indeed a more relaxed specification for generics, since they are a latter addition to the specification.

I would err on the side of some kind of compiler limitation, given that this example also raises CS3006:

using System;

[assembly: CLSCompliant(true)]

public class Test<T>
{
    public static void Expect(T arg)
    {
    }

    public static void Expect(ref T arg)
    {
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
    }
}

Apparently adding the generics to the class, rather than the method, raises the compiler's attention...

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I would guess such overloading isn't CLS-compliant, and the compiler's failure to flag it is simply a bug. The CLS does not require that languages provide any mechanism for method callers to distinguish between overloads that differ only in whether particular parameters are values or byrefs; if two overloads differ in that but are otherwise alike, at least one will be unusable in a language which can't make such a distinction. –  supercat Jan 22 at 16:58

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