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In the past, I've been able to implement a generic ArrayList by casting Object[] to E[]:

public class ArrayList<E>
{
    private E[] elements;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public ArrayList()
    {
        elements = (E[])new Object[16];
    }
 }

and I could use the generic array normally, like so:

public void add(E element)
{
    ...
    elements[size++] = element;
}

I thought I could implement a trie similarly:

public class Trie<V>
{
    private static class Node<V>
    {
        public V value;
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public Node<V>[] next = (Node<V>[])new Object[26];
    }

    private Node<V> root = new Node<V>();
}

However, the line public Node<V>[] next = (Node<V>[])new Object[26]; in Trie.Node causes a ClassCastException:

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        ArrayList<Integer> a = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        Trie<Integer> t = new Trie<Integer>();
    }
}

java Main
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassCastException: [Ljava.lang.Object; cannot be cast to [LTrie$Node;
    at Trie$Node.<init>(Trie.java:6)
    at Trie$Node.<init>(Trie.java:3)
    at Trie.<init>(Trie.java:10)
    at Main.main(Main.java:6)

So it's saying I can't cast Object[] to Trie.Node[].

What's the difference between casting from Object[] to E[] and casting from Object[] to Trie.Node<V>[]? Why is the former permitted and not the latter?

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Please improve your accept rating! –  manub Sep 26 '12 at 9:48
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The difference is that generics are implemented via erasure, and giving no bounds will erase that generic type into Object. E[] will become Object[], while Trie.Node<V>[] will become Trie.Node<Object>[]. Hence, (Node<V>[])new Object[26]; is a invalid cast as you're trying to cast Object[] to Node<Object>[].

You can find more information about how erasure works at http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html.

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Trie.Node<V>[] will become Trie.Node[] –  newacct Sep 26 '12 at 19:02
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public Node<V>[] next = (Node<V>[])new Object[26];

should be changed to

public Node<V>[] next = (Node<V>[])new Node[26];

or even

public Node<V>[] next = new Node[26];

as the cast is not checked anyway and both forms require @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")

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Does Node without the type parameter (Node<V>) simply mean Node<Object>? –  indil Sep 27 '12 at 1:23
    
Sorry I didn't see this question earlier. No, these are not the same. Using Node<Object> instead of Node would not compile since a Node<Object> is not a Node<V>. Using just node, you simply prevent the type checking. This is generally not a good idea, but works here because initially all the elements are null, and thus can be cast to any type, and you're only adding Node<V> elements, so won't get a ClassCastException. –  herman Feb 13 '13 at 0:12
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Node<V>[] array is not V[] It works in first case because Type information is E is available and ArrayList is uses Strong Typing.

So if you remove generics form picture what you are doing is casting Object[] to Node[] which will result in class cast exception.

You might want to use V[]

public V[] next = (V[])new Object[26];

More information available on Generics Tutorial

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