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I wish to create web script which will be executed by other user than the one that called it. The reason is simple: user who doesn't have permission to change certain objects can add/remove tags to it, so this tag manipulation should be done as other user.

Is there a way to do it as web script without meddling with Java?

Or, to put this the other way, is there a way to implement this functionality anyhow without Java (adding/removing tags on objects on which I don't have write permissions)?

Thanks!

D

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See the answers suggesting runas, but remember that your webscript should be designed carefully - if it is too flexible then you may be granting a lot of power to users! –  DNA Sep 27 '12 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some of tasks in alfresco such as creating user or groups needs admin permission. If you want to execute these as normal user, you can give admin permission to those user temporarily in webscripts.

simply changing webscript authentication using <authentication runas="admin">user</authentication> like here.

OR

Not changing in descriptor file, but in webscript controller file. Detail of coding and how to implement can be found in sudo like tools(1) here. and sudo like tools(2).

Hope it would help.

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I found these links are valuable for me. –  swemon Sep 26 '12 at 10:55
    
swemon, thanks for your answer and I will use your first suggestion –  Deveti Putnik Sep 26 '12 at 12:15
    
I edited my answer for another way for only to change in webscript. :D –  swemon Sep 26 '12 at 12:16

Like swemon said, you can do that. The webscript declaration file (ie. webscript.get.desc.xml) holds, among others, the line:

<authentication>user</authentication>

This is how it will run - as an authenticated user. You can also say:

<authentication>guest</authentication>

This means the webscript can be ran by anyone.

And finally, you can say:

<authentication runas="admin">user</authentication>

This means that the webscript will have administrative privileges.

You can then access all the needed data in the javascript controller file.

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