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hi i know i am new to rails. i came from ASP.Net mvc

but although most of the stuff in rails are very easy to do sometimes the small things which are easy in .net makes you crazy in rails.

i have a rails app and im just trying to add a class. and use it in my controller. this class is just for holding data. not from the db. just a simple class for me to use

so i added the class file first in the "/libs/assests" folder. then i read i needed to add a line to the application.rb file that says to load the files from there so i did..

config.autoload_paths += Dir["#{config.root}/lib", "#{config.root}/lib/**/"]

this still didn't work.. so ive put my class file in the regular Models folder. but it seem its still isn't working this is my class code:

   class Person
    attr_accessor :name, :role

      def initialize(name, role)
         @name = name
         @role = role
      end

     end

and in one of my controller is try to do this:

Person.new("name", "worker");

but i get this error: uninitialized constant MainController::Person

what is the big deal?.. why is this so complicated to add a public class to a project? thanks

share|improve this question
    
if you put this class to app/models in the file person.rb (note file name should match the class name) then it should work, unless you changed or broke anything in the default autoloading settings –  khustochka Sep 26 '12 at 10:53
    
its in the /models folder along with models created for the controllers. the name of the file is: person.rb and the class is: Person but still its the same error. –  guy schaller Sep 26 '12 at 10:57
    
Plus you don't need the initialize if your using attr_accessor. –  veritas1 Sep 26 '12 at 10:58
    
tried to remove the initialize, then do: @person = Person.New, still same error. if i remove the line from the controller (not use the class) the page loads fine. it this line specific that is creating the problem –  guy schaller Sep 26 '12 at 11:00
    
In you Rails.root start up the console: rails c Just reference the class name: Person What do you see? Without know much more, it looks like your load path might not be right. See what's in there: puts $:.join("\n") Lastly, brute forcing it might give you more info about the problem: require Rails.root.join("app","models", "person") This loads the file manually and skips the rails auto loading magic. –  mshiltonj Sep 26 '12 at 11:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to require the .rb file where the class is specified, you can do that with "require" or "require_relative":

http://rubylearning.com/satishtalim/including_other_files_in_ruby.html

share|improve this answer
    
hi, this did work.. i added: require "person" to the top of the file of my controller. but why do i need to?.. the file is inside the models folder... and what if i need it in a few controllers?. i don't want to write it again and again for all of them.. –  guy schaller Sep 26 '12 at 11:08
    
It should work without require if it is in app/models/person.rb –  khustochka Sep 26 '12 at 11:09
    
i added: require "person" in my application.rb file and now it works. –  guy schaller Sep 26 '12 at 11:19

In your Rails.root start up the console:

rails c

Just reference the class name:

Person

What do you see?

Without know much more, it looks like your load path might not be right. See what's in there:

puts $:.join("\n")

Lastly, brute forcing it might give you more info about the problem:

require Rails.root.join("app","models", "person")

This loads the file manually and skips the rails auto loading magic.

share|improve this answer

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