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What is the differ between string.Join & string.Concat similarly what is the diff between string.Equals & string.Compare

Show me with some example for each. I already searched but didn't understand.

Thanks in Advance.

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5  
Have you read the MSDN pages for each of these methods? If so, exactly what don't you understand? –  ChrisF Sep 26 '12 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

Join combines several strings with a separator in between; this is most often used if you have a list and want to format it in a way that there is a separator (e.g. a comma) between each element. Concat just appends them all after another. In a way, Join with an empty separator is equivalent to Concat.

Equals determines whether two strings are considered equal, Compare is for determining a sort order between two strings.

Honestly, though, this is all explained very well in the documentation.

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With .NET 4.0, String.Join() uses StringBuilder class internally so it is more efficient. Whereas String.Concat() uses basic concatenation of String using "+" which is of course not an efficient approach as String is immutable.

I compared String.Join() in .NET 2.0 framework where its implementation was different(it wasn't using StringBuilder in .NET 2.0). But with .NET 4.0, String.Join() is using StringBuilder() internally so its like easy wrapper on top of StringBuilder() for string concatenation.

Microsoft even recommends using StringBuilder class for any string concatenation.

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Program that joins strings [C#]

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    string[] arr = { "one", "two", "three" };

    // "string" can be lowercase, or...
    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(",", arr));

    // ... "String" can be uppercase:
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join(",", arr));
    }
}

Output - one,two,three one,two,three

Concat:

using System;
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    // 1.
    // New string called s1.
    string s1 = "string2";

    // 2.
    // Add another string to the start.
    string s2 = "string1" + s1;

    // 3.
    // Write to console.
    Console.WriteLine(s2);
    }
}

Output - string1string2

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these two methods are quite related. Although it hasn't been done, equals could have been implemented using compareTo:

public boolean equals(Object o)   
{   
    if (this == anObject)   
    {   
        return true;   
    }   
    if (o instanceof String)   
    {   
        String s = (String)o;   
        return compareTo(s) == 0;   
    }   
    return false;   
}  

Also, s1.equals(s2) == true implies s1.compareTo(s2) == 0 (and vice versa), and s1.equals(s2) == false implies s1.compareTo(s2) != 0 (and vice versa).

However, and this is important, this does not have to be the case for all classes. It is for String, but no rule prohibits different natural orders for other classes.

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